Athlete Profile

Ilona Usovich

  • COUNTRY Belarus Belarus
  • DATE OF BIRTH 14 NOV 1982
Belarusian 400m runner Ilona Usovich (Getty Images)
Belarusian 400m runner Ilona Usovich (Getty Images)
  • COUNTRY Belarus Belarus
  • DATE OF BIRTH 14 NOV 1982


Focus on Athletes biographies are produced by the IAAF Communications Dept, and not by the IAAF Statistics and Documentation Division. If you have any enquiries concerning the information, please use the Contact IAAF page, selecting ‘Focus on Athletes Biographies’ in the drop down menu of contact area options.


Updated 1 March 2008

Ilona Usovich, Belarus (400m)

Born: 14 November, 1982, Cherven, Minsk region

Lives: ??nsk

Manager: Pavel Voronkov

Coach: Igor Zaharevich


Ilona Usovich was born in the small city of Cherven, 60km from Minsk. The sports choice there was small - football and athletics. Ilona showed a talent for athletics as she was mobile, quick and eager and, in school competitions, she outstripped even boys. But the local teacher of physical culture first saw potential in her elder sister, Sviatlana, and sent her to children's sports school. The girls were very close and Ilona, who was two years younger, showed great interest in what Sviatlana was doing. Her elder sister was an example for her.

The girls liked sports and were keen to be at sports school. Sviatlana was invited to Minsk, to the republic sports school, and Ilona did not want to lag behind. She worked hard and, two years later, she was accepted into the same school. Later both went to the well-known trainer, Igor Zaharevich. 

“I always tried to keep step with my sister,” Ilona said. “It seemed to me that she was more talented, than me. At first, I was not sure that I could also run as fast as Sveta.  I thought I did not have the natural talent. In school, under the control of trainer Viktoriya Bozhedarova, I ran sprints. She even suggested I change to the hurdles. But it was not for me. Zaharevich made me believe in myself again but insisted I choose 400m.”

The trainer also suggested she lose weight and they began to work on endurance, running cross-country. Ilona did not understand at first how necessary this was to run 400m. She could run the first 100m fast but would have no strength for the last 300m. Her trainer taught her to run it the opposite way round, leaving her strength until the last 100m. In time, she acquired the experience and one day the trainer told the sisters: “I can see you both at the 2004 Olympics, in the 4?400m relay.” At first, the girls did not believe him. But it happened.

Having finished fourth in the National Championship (52.31), Ilona took part in the 2004 World Indoor Championships, in Budapest, in which the Belarus relay team placed second behind Russia. Ilona ran the third leg and Sviatlana the fourth, their first serious success. In the process, they set a national record 3:29.96.

“At the Olympic Games our quartet was ninth,” Ilona said. “The Romanian girls, who made the final eight, have outstripped us by 0.02 sec. I ran at the third stage and in general have shown my best. But we were not downhearted and, after the Olympics, our results picked up. At the (2005) European Indoor Championships, in Madrid, I ran the individual 400m for the first time and missed third place by only 0.01.”

In the summer, during the World Championships, in Helsinki, Ilona just missed out on a place in the final but set a personal record 50.96. It was her first run under 51 seconds. At the 2006 World Indoor Championships, in Moscow, again she narrowly failed to make the final, clocking an indoor personal best 51.53. She followed this with a bronze medal in the 4x400m.

At the European Championships, in Gothenburg, the Belarusian girl already was fifth and set two national records - 50.74 in her heat and 50.69 in the final. She was included in the European team for the World Cup, in Athens, finishing fourth as member of the continent’s select 4x400m squad. Then, at the 2007 European Indoor Championships, in Birmingham, England, she took the individual silver medal, behind Britain’s Nicola Sanders, with a personal record 51.00. Together with Yulyana Yuschanka, Iryna Khliustava and Sviatlana Usovich, she helped Belarus win gold in the 4x400m.

Moving into the 2007 summer season, and the European Cup in Munich, the same quartet took first place with a national record 3:23.67 after the favourites, Russia, were disqualified for a false start. In 2007, at the World Championships, in Osaka, they ran almost two seconds quicker (3:21.88) but, while in other years that would have been good enough for a medal, on this occasion Belarus were only fifth. Ilona reached the individual final too, placing seventh, with two national records (50.53h, 50.31sf). In the final she was just outside her best (50.54). 

According to her trainer’s decision, Ilona will run only the relay at the World Indoor Championship, in Valencia, together with her sister. It is not long until the Olympic Games and she wants to save her best for Beijing.

For the time being, Ilona’s greater successes have been in the relay. Why? “I like the emotional and passionate struggle,” she says. “Moreover, in the relay, you must run not only for yourself, but for team also. It helps to keep you in best form.”

 

Personal Bests

400m: 50.31 (2007); 51.00i (2007)


Yearly Progression

2004 – 52.31; 2005 – 50.96 (52.06i); 2006 – 50.69 NR (51.53i); 2007 – 50.31 NR (51.00i); 2008 – 51.80i.


Career Highlights

2004 2nd World Indoor Championships, 4x400m
2005 4th European Indoor Championships, 400m
2006 3rd  World Indoor Championships, 4x400m
2006 5th  European Championships, 400m
2006 2nd  European Championships, 4x400m
2007 2nd European Indoor Championships, 400m
2007 1st  European Indoor Championships, 4x400m
2007 7th   World Championships, 400m


Prepared by Mikhail Dubitski for the IAAF ‘Focus on Athletes’ project. Copyright IAAF 2008.

 

Personal Best - Outdoor
Performance Wind Place Date
400 Metres 50.31 Osaka 27 AUG 2007
800 Metres 1:59.38 Brest, BLR 21 MAY 2011
Personal Best - Indoor
Performance Wind Place Date
400 Metres 51.00 Birmingham, GBR 03 MAR 2007
600 Metres 1:25.91 Mogilev 02 FEB 2008
800 Metres 2:02.94 Mogilev 27 JAN 2007
Progression - Outdoor showShow All Graphs
400 Metres Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2013 52.19 Budapest 10 JUL
2012 51.31 Budapest 20 AUG
2011 52.67 Minsk 11 AUG
2008 51.50 Ankara 13 JUN
2007 50.31 Osaka 27 AUG
2006 50.69 Göteborg 10 AUG
2005 50.96 Helsinki 08 AUG
2004 52.31 Minsk 25 JUN
2003 54.75 Minsk 28 JUN
800 Metres Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2013 2:02.62 Reims 28 JUN
2011 1:59.38 Brest, BLR 21 MAY
2008 2:02.75 Ankara 14 JUN
2007 2:03.12 Minsk 02 JUN
Progression - Indoor showShow All Graphs
400 Metres Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2008 51.80 Mogilev 22 FEB
2007 51.00 Birmingham, GBR 03 MAR
2006 51.53 Moskva (Olimpiyskiy Stadion) 11 MAR
2005 52.06 Madrid 05 MAR
600 Metres Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2008 1:25.91 Mogilev 02 FEB
800 Metres Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2008 2:04.08 Mogilev 26 JAN
2007 2:02.94 Mogilev 27 JAN
Honours - 400 Metres
Rank Mark Wind Place Date
5th IAAF World Athletics Final 8 51.38 Stuttgart 23 SEP 2007
11th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 7 50.54 Osaka 29 AUG 2007
11th IAAF World Indoor Championships 4sf1 51.53 Moskva (Olimpiyskiy Stadion) 11 MAR 2006
10th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 5sf3 50.96 Helsinki 08 AUG 2005


Focus on Athletes biographies are produced by the IAAF Communications Dept, and not by the IAAF Statistics and Documentation Division. If you have any enquiries concerning the information, please use the Contact IAAF page, selecting ‘Focus on Athletes Biographies’ in the drop down menu of contact area options.


Updated 1 March 2008

Ilona Usovich, Belarus (400m)

Born: 14 November, 1982, Cherven, Minsk region

Lives: ??nsk

Manager: Pavel Voronkov

Coach: Igor Zaharevich


Ilona Usovich was born in the small city of Cherven, 60km from Minsk. The sports choice there was small - football and athletics. Ilona showed a talent for athletics as she was mobile, quick and eager and, in school competitions, she outstripped even boys. But the local teacher of physical culture first saw potential in her elder sister, Sviatlana, and sent her to children's sports school. The girls were very close and Ilona, who was two years younger, showed great interest in what Sviatlana was doing. Her elder sister was an example for her.

The girls liked sports and were keen to be at sports school. Sviatlana was invited to Minsk, to the republic sports school, and Ilona did not want to lag behind. She worked hard and, two years later, she was accepted into the same school. Later both went to the well-known trainer, Igor Zaharevich. 

“I always tried to keep step with my sister,” Ilona said. “It seemed to me that she was more talented, than me. At first, I was not sure that I could also run as fast as Sveta.  I thought I did not have the natural talent. In school, under the control of trainer Viktoriya Bozhedarova, I ran sprints. She even suggested I change to the hurdles. But it was not for me. Zaharevich made me believe in myself again but insisted I choose 400m.”

The trainer also suggested she lose weight and they began to work on endurance, running cross-country. Ilona did not understand at first how necessary this was to run 400m. She could run the first 100m fast but would have no strength for the last 300m. Her trainer taught her to run it the opposite way round, leaving her strength until the last 100m. In time, she acquired the experience and one day the trainer told the sisters: “I can see you both at the 2004 Olympics, in the 4?400m relay.” At first, the girls did not believe him. But it happened.

Having finished fourth in the National Championship (52.31), Ilona took part in the 2004 World Indoor Championships, in Budapest, in which the Belarus relay team placed second behind Russia. Ilona ran the third leg and Sviatlana the fourth, their first serious success. In the process, they set a national record 3:29.96.

“At the Olympic Games our quartet was ninth,” Ilona said. “The Romanian girls, who made the final eight, have outstripped us by 0.02 sec. I ran at the third stage and in general have shown my best. But we were not downhearted and, after the Olympics, our results picked up. At the (2005) European Indoor Championships, in Madrid, I ran the individual 400m for the first time and missed third place by only 0.01.”

In the summer, during the World Championships, in Helsinki, Ilona just missed out on a place in the final but set a personal record 50.96. It was her first run under 51 seconds. At the 2006 World Indoor Championships, in Moscow, again she narrowly failed to make the final, clocking an indoor personal best 51.53. She followed this with a bronze medal in the 4x400m.

At the European Championships, in Gothenburg, the Belarusian girl already was fifth and set two national records - 50.74 in her heat and 50.69 in the final. She was included in the European team for the World Cup, in Athens, finishing fourth as member of the continent’s select 4x400m squad. Then, at the 2007 European Indoor Championships, in Birmingham, England, she took the individual silver medal, behind Britain’s Nicola Sanders, with a personal record 51.00. Together with Yulyana Yuschanka, Iryna Khliustava and Sviatlana Usovich, she helped Belarus win gold in the 4x400m.

Moving into the 2007 summer season, and the European Cup in Munich, the same quartet took first place with a national record 3:23.67 after the favourites, Russia, were disqualified for a false start. In 2007, at the World Championships, in Osaka, they ran almost two seconds quicker (3:21.88) but, while in other years that would have been good enough for a medal, on this occasion Belarus were only fifth. Ilona reached the individual final too, placing seventh, with two national records (50.53h, 50.31sf). In the final she was just outside her best (50.54). 

According to her trainer’s decision, Ilona will run only the relay at the World Indoor Championship, in Valencia, together with her sister. It is not long until the Olympic Games and she wants to save her best for Beijing.

For the time being, Ilona’s greater successes have been in the relay. Why? “I like the emotional and passionate struggle,” she says. “Moreover, in the relay, you must run not only for yourself, but for team also. It helps to keep you in best form.”

 

Personal Bests

400m: 50.31 (2007); 51.00i (2007)


Yearly Progression

2004 – 52.31; 2005 – 50.96 (52.06i); 2006 – 50.69 NR (51.53i); 2007 – 50.31 NR (51.00i); 2008 – 51.80i.


Career Highlights

2004 2nd World Indoor Championships, 4x400m
2005 4th European Indoor Championships, 400m
2006 3rd  World Indoor Championships, 4x400m
2006 5th  European Championships, 400m
2006 2nd  European Championships, 4x400m
2007 2nd European Indoor Championships, 400m
2007 1st  European Indoor Championships, 4x400m
2007 7th   World Championships, 400m


Prepared by Mikhail Dubitski for the IAAF ‘Focus on Athletes’ project. Copyright IAAF 2008.