Keila Costa of Brazil looks on as she competes in the Women's Long Jump qualification - WIC Istanbul  (Getty Images)
Keila Costa of Brazil looks on as she competes in the Women's Long Jump qualification - WIC Istanbul  (Getty Images)
  • COUNTRY Brazil Brazil
  • DATE OF BIRTH 6 FEB 1983


Focus on Athletes biographies are produced by the IAAF Communications Dept, and not by the IAAF Statistics and Documentation Division. If you have any enquiries concerning the information, please use the Contact IAAF page, selecting ‘Focus on Athletes Biographies’ in the drop down menu of contact area options.


Updated 4 March 2008

Keila da Silva COSTA, Brazil (Long and Triple Jump)

Born 6 February, 1983, Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil; 1.70m, 62kg

Lives in Sao Paulo

Coach: Nélio Alfano Moura

Club: Clube de Atletismo BM&F (BM&F Athletics Club)


Since she was a little girl, Keila da Silva Costa seemed to be one of the most talented athletes in South America. During those days, she achieved two South American Junior records which are still unbeaten. When she grew up, and started competing at senior level, she kept improving until she made the international elite group. Costa is now considered one of the main stars of the circuit in long jump and triple jump.

However, Costa’s most extraordinary victory was to reach that level, taking into account that she had trained for 12 years in pauper conditions. There were neither synthetic tracks nor the necessary elements for an athlete to develop in her town, Recife, in the north east corner of Brazil, far from the big cities. Also, Costa comes from a humble family, so she could not count on her parents’ support for travelling or competing.

Inspired by her older sister, Danielle, Costa took up athletics when she was 9 years old in the Projeto Atletas do Futuro (Development Programme) led by Roberto Ribeiro de Andrade. She spent her first 12 years as an athlete in Abreu e Lima, next to Recife, running on a clay track at a simple stadium which, without even a mat or hurdles, lacked any modern facilities.

Nevertheless, she went to the 2002 World Junior Championships, in Kingston, where she won the triple jump bronze medal with her sixth and last attempt. It was the first podium for Brazil in World Junior Championships history. Thanks to that performance, she became the most promising athlete in Brazil together with Jadel Gregorio. Later in 2002, she broke the South American junior long jump record (6.46), having done the same in triple jump the year before (14.00).

Media pressure had such a great effect on Costa that she could not train well enough to qualify for the 2003 Pan American Games, in Santo Domingo. Furthermore, she suffered an injury that forced her to stop competing for eight months. As the development programme she was part of ended, because of lack of funds, Costa had to move away and met a new coach, Pedro Henrique Toledo.

Once in Sao Paulo, Costa had the opportunity to train in better conditions, having great impact on her marks. Moreover, she managed to get the necessary standard to take part in the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens. But her first Olympic participation was not as successful as expected. Although her best mark at long jump was 6.61, she could manage only 6.33 in the qualifying round. But sharing a runway with the best athletes in the world was an unforgettable experience for her.

During 2005, and with Nélio Alfano Moura as her new coach, Costa did not improve her records much as she was out of most competitions because of another injury. But she returned in 2006. She felt excited not only about her own return, but also because Maurren Higa Maggi, a fellow Brazilian who used to be her idol, was back after a two-year doping sanction. As they compete in the same disciplines, they motivated themselves and helped each other to improve as they train at the BM&F Athletics Club.

Nowadays, Costa has another reason to train hard every day without suffering too much pain. In Athens 2004 she met the Panamanian, Irving Saladino, the reigning (2007) men’s long jump world champion. Saladino moved to Sao Paulo so as to train with the same coach as Costa, Nélio Alfano Moura.

Costa and Saladino have many things in common: they love athletics with passion, they compete in the same discipline, they were both born in 1983 and they share the same humble origins. As they had already begun to talk about a wedding, Costa travelled to Panama in 2006 to meet Saladino’s parents. But the 2008 Beijing Olympics are still their priority.

“I’m very happy with Irving and I’d like to marry him,” Costa said. “But now we want to grow up and improve as athletes, we’ll have enough time to organise everything.”

This calm attitude in life, and the hard work with a nutritionist and a psychologist, helped both to improve their PBs and started them dreaming of a great Olympic performance. During the South American Championships in 2007, Costa broke the South American triple jump record (14.57) which belonged to Maggi, barely three weeks after improving her PB to 6.88 in the long jump.

Costa showed a competitive spirit when she won two silver medals in Rio de Janeiro at the Pan American Games - the first in long jump behind Maggi, and the other in triple jump, behind Cuban Yargelis Savigne. With tears she declared: “You never have to feel defeated, even when things get complicated or you don’t count on the necessary resources as clothes and a good track”. Besides, as Saladino won the long jump in Rio, they became known as “The Golden Couple” in Brazil.

Fortunately, happiness would go with this couple. At the Osaka World Championships, Costa reached both long jump and triple jump finals. Although she couldn’t win any medal, she finished 7th in long jump (6.69) and 9th in triple jump (14.40). Meanwhile, Saladino was one of the stars of the championships, achieving the first Panamanian athletics world title.

“The lesson that I’ve learned from Osaka is that you don’t have to feel completed by just reaching the final, that you must go and fight for the medals until the last jump”, she explained. At the end of the season, Costa took part in the World Athletics Final, in Stuttgart, where she was 5th in long jump (6.46) and 6th in triple jump (14.13).

Costa dreams of reaching 15 metres in the triple jump – her favourite discipline -- and the 7-metre barrier in long jump this year. But she did not start the Olympic year too promisingly. She could not train as usual because of some physical pain and jumped 6.41m in the Valencia indoor meeting. Saladino has also had a slight injury on his ankle. In order to prevent aggravating the injury, he won’t take part in the World Indoor Championships.


Personal Bests

Triple Jump: 14.57/15.10w (2007); 14.11i (2006)
Long Jump: 6.88, 6.60i (2007)


Yearly Progression

Triple Jump: 1998: 11.74/11.91w; 1999: 12.62; 2000: 13.23/13.65w; 2001: 14.00/14.15w; 2002: 13.78/13.80w; 2003: 13.68/13.69w; 2004: 13.80; 2005: 13.95; 2006: 14.17/14.11i; 2007: 14.57/15.10w.
Long Jump: 1999: 5.83; 2000: 6.05a; 2001: 6.20/6.24w; 2002: 6.46; 2003: 6.52; 2004: 6.61; 2005: 6.63; 2006: 6.59/6.34i; 2007: 6.88/6.60i; 2008: 6.41i.


Career Highlights

2000 11th World Junior Championships (Santiago)  12.97
2001 1st   South American Championships   TJ
2002 3rd  World Junior Championships (Kingston)  13.70
2003 1st  South American Championships   LJ
1st  South American Championships   TJ
2004 3rd  Ibero-American Championships (Huelva) 13.80
q  Olympic Games (Athens)      6.33
2006 q  World Indoor Championships (Moscow)  14.11i
1st  Ibero-American Championships (Ponce)    6.54
7th  World Cup in Athletics (Athens)     6.33
2007 1st  South American Championships (Sao Paulo) 14.57
2nd  South American Championships (Sao Paulo)   6.83
 2nd  Pan American Games (Rio de Janeiro)    6.73
 2nd  Pan American Games (Rio de Janeiro)  14.38
 7th   World Championships (Osaka)     6.69
 9th  World Championships (Osaka)   14.40
 5th  World Athletics Final (Stuttgart)     6.46
 6th  World Athletics Final (Stuttgart)   14.13

 

Prepared by Víctor Pochat for the IAAF ‘Focus on Athletes’ project. Copyright IAAF 2008.

Personal Best - Outdoor
Performance Wind Place Date
Long Jump 6.88 -0.1 Belém (Mangueirão) 20 MAY 2007
Triple Jump 14.58 +2.0 São Paulo (IDCM) 07 JUN 2013
Personal Best - Indoor
Performance Wind Place Date
Long Jump 6.64 Paris-Bercy (Palais Omnisports) 13 FEB 2009
Triple Jump 14.11 Moskva (Olimpiyskiy Stadion) 10 MAR 2006
Progression - Outdoor showShow All Graphs
Long Jump Show Graphshow
Performance Wind Place Date
2014 6.45 +1.8 Székesfehérvár 08 JUL
2013 6.56 -0.6 Belém (Mangueirão) 12 MAY
2012 6.68 +1.4 São Paulo (IDCM) 16 MAY
2011 6.67 +0.4 São Paulo (IDCM) 22 MAY
2010 6.68 +0.4 Rio de Janeiro 23 MAY
2009 6.79 0.0 Rio de Janeiro 07 JUN
2008 6.79 +0.1 São Paulo 29 JUN
2007 6.88 -0.1 Belém (Mangueirão) 20 MAY
2006 6.59 +1.3 São Paulo 19 AUG
2005 6.63 +1.3 São Paulo 17 JUN
2004 6.61 +0.5 Recife 17 APR
2003 6.52 +0.3 São Paulo 15 JUN
2002 6.46 0.0 Rio de Janeiro 29 SEP
Triple Jump Show Graphshow
Performance Wind Place Date
2014 13.91 +2.0 Lausanne 03 JUL
2013 14.58 +2.0 São Paulo (IDCM) 07 JUN
2012 14.31 +0.5 Doha 11 MAY
2011 14.24 -0.8 São Paulo (AFDS) 23 FEB
2010 13.79 +1.0 São Paulo 16 SEP
2007 14.57 +0.2 São Paulo 09 JUN
2006 14.17 -0.8 São Paulo 11 FEB
2005 13.95 +1.3 Haniá 06 JUN
2004 13.80 +1.2 Huelva 07 AUG
2003 13.68 +0.2 São Paulo 13 JUN
2002 13.78 -0.5 Belém (Mangueirão) 01 AUG
2001 14.00 +0.8 São Caetano do Sul 22 APR
2000 13.23 Manaus 27 AUG
Progression - Indoor showShow All Graphs
Long Jump Show Graphshow
Performance Wind Place Date
2014 6.36 Birmingham (NIA), GBR 15 FEB
2012 6.45 Istanbul (Ataköy Arena) 10 MAR
2011 6.42 Eaubonne 11 FEB
2010 6.63 Doha 14 MAR
2009 6.64 Paris-Bercy (Palais Omnisports) 13 FEB
2008 6.48 Valencia, ESP 09 MAR
2007 6.60 Leipzig 09 FEB
2006 6.34 Stuttgart 04 FEB
Triple Jump Show Graphshow
Performance Wind Place Date
2014 13.69 Eaubonne 11 FEB
2012 13.93 Stockholm 23 FEB
2011 13.90 Gent 13 FEB
2009 13.35 Pireás 25 FEB
2006 14.11 Moskva (Olimpiyskiy Stadion) 10 MAR
Honours - Long Jump
Rank Mark Wind Place Date
IAAF World Indoor Championships 2012 11q1 6.45 Istanbul (Ataköy Arena) 10 MAR 2012
13th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 13q1 6.26 Daegu 27 AUG 2011
13th IAAF World Indoor Championships 3 6.63 Doha 14 MAR 2010
IAAF/VTB Bank World Athletics Final 7 6.53 +3.1 Thessaloniki 12 SEP 2009
12th IAAF World Championships in Athletics f NM +0.3 Berlin 23 AUG 2009
The XXIX Olympic Games 11 6.43 +0.3 Beijing (National Stadium) 22 AUG 2008
12th IAAF World Indoor Championships 7 6.48 Valencia, ESP 09 MAR 2008
5th IAAF World Athletics Final 5 6.46 +0.4 Stuttgart 22 SEP 2007
11th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 7 6.69 0.0 Osaka (Nagai Stadium) 28 AUG 2007
10th IAAF World Cup 7 6.33 +0.2 Athína (Olympic Stadium) 17 SEP 2006
28th Olympic Games 14q2 6.33 0.0 Athína (Olympic Stadium) 25 AUG 2004
IAAF/Coca Cola World Junior Championships 9q1 5.98 +1.1 Kingston, JAM 18 JUL 2002
Honours - Triple Jump
Rank Mark Wind Place Date
IAAF World Indoor Championships 2014 10q1 13.64 Sopot (Ergo Arena) 07 MAR 2014
14th IAAF World Championships 7q1 13.82 -0.4 Moskva (Luzhniki) 13 AUG 2013
The XXX Olympic Games 11q2 13.84 -0.5 London (OP) 03 AUG 2012
13th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 12 13.72 0.0 Daegu 01 SEP 2011
5th IAAF World Athletics Final 6 14.13 +0.5 Stuttgart 23 SEP 2007
11th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 9 14.40 +1.1 Osaka (Nagai Stadium) 31 AUG 2007
11th IAAF World Indoor Championships 6q1 14.11 Moskva (Olimpiyskiy Stadion) 10 MAR 2006
IAAF/Coca Cola World Junior Championships 3 13.70 +0.5 Kingston, JAM 17 JUL 2002
IAAF/Coca Cola World Junior Championships 11 12.97 +0.9 Santiago de Chile 21 OCT 2000


Focus on Athletes biographies are produced by the IAAF Communications Dept, and not by the IAAF Statistics and Documentation Division. If you have any enquiries concerning the information, please use the Contact IAAF page, selecting ‘Focus on Athletes Biographies’ in the drop down menu of contact area options.


Updated 4 March 2008

Keila da Silva COSTA, Brazil (Long and Triple Jump)

Born 6 February, 1983, Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil; 1.70m, 62kg

Lives in Sao Paulo

Coach: Nélio Alfano Moura

Club: Clube de Atletismo BM&F (BM&F Athletics Club)


Since she was a little girl, Keila da Silva Costa seemed to be one of the most talented athletes in South America. During those days, she achieved two South American Junior records which are still unbeaten. When she grew up, and started competing at senior level, she kept improving until she made the international elite group. Costa is now considered one of the main stars of the circuit in long jump and triple jump.

However, Costa’s most extraordinary victory was to reach that level, taking into account that she had trained for 12 years in pauper conditions. There were neither synthetic tracks nor the necessary elements for an athlete to develop in her town, Recife, in the north east corner of Brazil, far from the big cities. Also, Costa comes from a humble family, so she could not count on her parents’ support for travelling or competing.

Inspired by her older sister, Danielle, Costa took up athletics when she was 9 years old in the Projeto Atletas do Futuro (Development Programme) led by Roberto Ribeiro de Andrade. She spent her first 12 years as an athlete in Abreu e Lima, next to Recife, running on a clay track at a simple stadium which, without even a mat or hurdles, lacked any modern facilities.

Nevertheless, she went to the 2002 World Junior Championships, in Kingston, where she won the triple jump bronze medal with her sixth and last attempt. It was the first podium for Brazil in World Junior Championships history. Thanks to that performance, she became the most promising athlete in Brazil together with Jadel Gregorio. Later in 2002, she broke the South American junior long jump record (6.46), having done the same in triple jump the year before (14.00).

Media pressure had such a great effect on Costa that she could not train well enough to qualify for the 2003 Pan American Games, in Santo Domingo. Furthermore, she suffered an injury that forced her to stop competing for eight months. As the development programme she was part of ended, because of lack of funds, Costa had to move away and met a new coach, Pedro Henrique Toledo.

Once in Sao Paulo, Costa had the opportunity to train in better conditions, having great impact on her marks. Moreover, she managed to get the necessary standard to take part in the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens. But her first Olympic participation was not as successful as expected. Although her best mark at long jump was 6.61, she could manage only 6.33 in the qualifying round. But sharing a runway with the best athletes in the world was an unforgettable experience for her.

During 2005, and with Nélio Alfano Moura as her new coach, Costa did not improve her records much as she was out of most competitions because of another injury. But she returned in 2006. She felt excited not only about her own return, but also because Maurren Higa Maggi, a fellow Brazilian who used to be her idol, was back after a two-year doping sanction. As they compete in the same disciplines, they motivated themselves and helped each other to improve as they train at the BM&F Athletics Club.

Nowadays, Costa has another reason to train hard every day without suffering too much pain. In Athens 2004 she met the Panamanian, Irving Saladino, the reigning (2007) men’s long jump world champion. Saladino moved to Sao Paulo so as to train with the same coach as Costa, Nélio Alfano Moura.

Costa and Saladino have many things in common: they love athletics with passion, they compete in the same discipline, they were both born in 1983 and they share the same humble origins. As they had already begun to talk about a wedding, Costa travelled to Panama in 2006 to meet Saladino’s parents. But the 2008 Beijing Olympics are still their priority.

“I’m very happy with Irving and I’d like to marry him,” Costa said. “But now we want to grow up and improve as athletes, we’ll have enough time to organise everything.”

This calm attitude in life, and the hard work with a nutritionist and a psychologist, helped both to improve their PBs and started them dreaming of a great Olympic performance. During the South American Championships in 2007, Costa broke the South American triple jump record (14.57) which belonged to Maggi, barely three weeks after improving her PB to 6.88 in the long jump.

Costa showed a competitive spirit when she won two silver medals in Rio de Janeiro at the Pan American Games - the first in long jump behind Maggi, and the other in triple jump, behind Cuban Yargelis Savigne. With tears she declared: “You never have to feel defeated, even when things get complicated or you don’t count on the necessary resources as clothes and a good track”. Besides, as Saladino won the long jump in Rio, they became known as “The Golden Couple” in Brazil.

Fortunately, happiness would go with this couple. At the Osaka World Championships, Costa reached both long jump and triple jump finals. Although she couldn’t win any medal, she finished 7th in long jump (6.69) and 9th in triple jump (14.40). Meanwhile, Saladino was one of the stars of the championships, achieving the first Panamanian athletics world title.

“The lesson that I’ve learned from Osaka is that you don’t have to feel completed by just reaching the final, that you must go and fight for the medals until the last jump”, she explained. At the end of the season, Costa took part in the World Athletics Final, in Stuttgart, where she was 5th in long jump (6.46) and 6th in triple jump (14.13).

Costa dreams of reaching 15 metres in the triple jump – her favourite discipline -- and the 7-metre barrier in long jump this year. But she did not start the Olympic year too promisingly. She could not train as usual because of some physical pain and jumped 6.41m in the Valencia indoor meeting. Saladino has also had a slight injury on his ankle. In order to prevent aggravating the injury, he won’t take part in the World Indoor Championships.


Personal Bests

Triple Jump: 14.57/15.10w (2007); 14.11i (2006)
Long Jump: 6.88, 6.60i (2007)


Yearly Progression

Triple Jump: 1998: 11.74/11.91w; 1999: 12.62; 2000: 13.23/13.65w; 2001: 14.00/14.15w; 2002: 13.78/13.80w; 2003: 13.68/13.69w; 2004: 13.80; 2005: 13.95; 2006: 14.17/14.11i; 2007: 14.57/15.10w.
Long Jump: 1999: 5.83; 2000: 6.05a; 2001: 6.20/6.24w; 2002: 6.46; 2003: 6.52; 2004: 6.61; 2005: 6.63; 2006: 6.59/6.34i; 2007: 6.88/6.60i; 2008: 6.41i.


Career Highlights

2000 11th World Junior Championships (Santiago)  12.97
2001 1st   South American Championships   TJ
2002 3rd  World Junior Championships (Kingston)  13.70
2003 1st  South American Championships   LJ
1st  South American Championships   TJ
2004 3rd  Ibero-American Championships (Huelva) 13.80
q  Olympic Games (Athens)      6.33
2006 q  World Indoor Championships (Moscow)  14.11i
1st  Ibero-American Championships (Ponce)    6.54
7th  World Cup in Athletics (Athens)     6.33
2007 1st  South American Championships (Sao Paulo) 14.57
2nd  South American Championships (Sao Paulo)   6.83
 2nd  Pan American Games (Rio de Janeiro)    6.73
 2nd  Pan American Games (Rio de Janeiro)  14.38
 7th   World Championships (Osaka)     6.69
 9th  World Championships (Osaka)   14.40
 5th  World Athletics Final (Stuttgart)     6.46
 6th  World Athletics Final (Stuttgart)   14.13

 

Prepared by Víctor Pochat for the IAAF ‘Focus on Athletes’ project. Copyright IAAF 2008.