Caterine Ibarguen (Getty Images)
Caterine Ibarguen (Getty Images)
  • COUNTRY Colombia Colombia
  • DATE OF BIRTH 12 FEB 1984


Focus on Athletes biographies are produced by the IAAF Communications Dept, and not by the IAAF Statistics and Documentation Division. If you have any enquiries concerning the information, please use the Contact IAAF page, selecting ‘Focus on Athletes Biographies’ in the drop down menu of contact area options.


Created 29 July 2012

 

Caterine IBARGÜEN Mena, Colombia (Long Jump/Triple Jump)

Born 12 February 1984 in Apartadó, Antioquia

1.81m, 65Kg

Coach: Ubaldo Duany (CUB)

 

Twenty years after Ximena Restrepo’s historic bronze medal at the 1992 Barcelona Games, Colombia is dreaming again of another Olympic medal in athletics, thanks to Caterine Ibargüen.

Born in Antioquia’s sub-region of Urabá, an area that’s well known for its banana plantations, Ibargüen was raised by her grandmother Ayola Rivas after her parents broke up. Her mother Francisca worked as a cook in gold mines in Antioquia and her father William settled in neighbouring Venezuela.

She began playing volleyball before taking up athletics at the age of 12 in her hometown of Apartadó. She was then invited to move to Medellín, the capital of Antioquia, to continue training there, where more resources were available.

“My first coach was Wilder Zapata. He discovered me at my school. I began at High Jump in 1996, when I was moved to Medellín’s “Villa Deportiva” – a high performance centre.” There she began training under Cuban coach Jorge Luis Alfaro, who was also training South American record holder Gilmar Mayo, and focused on the High Jump.

In 1999, aged only 15, Ibargüen won her first medal at the senior South American Championships, taking bronze with 1.76. In 2000, she continued to train with another Cuban coach, Regla Sandrino. “I guess that’s when I consolidated myself at the event,” she recalled.

A year later, she savoured her first international win at the Bolivarian Games in Ambato, Ecuador, in September and then contested the High Jump, Long Jump and Triple Jump at both the South American Junior Championships – where she medalled in each event – and at the Pan American Junior Championships – where she was second in the High Jump and a finalist in the other events.

In 2002, she improved in the Triple Jump, setting a national junior record of 13.38. She combined the two events and won medals in both at the Central American and Caribbean Junior Championships in Barbados and the CAC Games in San Salvador.

In between, she had her first global experience when she contested the Triple Jump at the World Junior Championships, in Kingston, but failed to qualify to the final.

Her focus remained on the High Jump, where in 2003 she set the national record and equalled the South American junior record with 1.86m as well as national junior record in the Long Jump with 6.18A.

She improved her record to 1.91m in 2004 to make the Colombian team for the Olympic Games in Athens at the age of 20 but did not make it past the qualifications. At the National Games at the end of the year, she also set her first national records in the Long Jump (6.42A) and Triple Jump (13.64A).

Ibargüen consolidated herself as the region’s top High Jumper as she collected two South American Junior titles (2001 and 2003) and five South American titles in a row (U23 in 2004 and 2006,  Senior in 2005-2007). In 2005, she reached her best of 1.93 and contested her first World Championships in Helsinki, but again failed to make it to the final.

The following year, she contested her first and so far only competition indoors at the World Indoor Championships in Moscow. But her results stalled and after failing to qualify to the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, she felt she needed a change in her career.

“When I failed to qualify for the 2008 Games, I felt depressed, like I wanted to quit the sport. That’s when I move to Puerto Rico – at the end of 2008 – to study at the “Universidad Metropolitana”. The idea was to set the focus in the Triple Jump and Heptathlon, under the guidance of Ubaldo Duany.”

Cuba’s Duany, an 8.32 Long Jumper (1986) and 1989 World Indoor finalist, saw that Ibargüen’s potential in the High Jump was limited, due to how her body had changed over the years. When she obtained her scholarship to study nursing in Puerto Rico, Duany sat down to trace a plan for her, more adapted to her potential.

“I knew it would be hard to keep improving in the High Jump, as she had developed more muscular mass in her lower extremities. I figured that she would have to lose weight in order to jump higher. So, with that in mind, I understood she would do much better at Long and Triple, even with the chance of competing at high level,” recalled Duany.

“When I decided to move to Puerto Rico, I was determined to make the most of it. I wanted to study and work hard with Coach Duany. He knew me well, and although I had done Triple Jump before, we needed to correct the major technical mistakes I was carrying,” explained Ibargüen. “We had to start from scratch, and I used to wonder, ‘When am I going to dominate this event?’ It was pretty hard for me, but I always remained optimistic, thanks to the support of a great coach, who is very positive,” she added.

2010 marked her first tests of fire and she soon started to see progress as a Triple Jump specialist. She picked up silver behind World champion Yargelis Savigne at the Iberoamerican Championships with a national record of 14.29. A month and a half later, she added a silver at the Central American Games, in Puerto Rico.   “I guess those results left us (my coach and myself), much more positive for the future,” commented the young Colombian.

The stage was set for a breakthrough in 2011. In 13 finals she contested, Ibargüen improved or equalled the Colombian Triple Jump record on seven occasions, and the South American mark on four. In the process, she collected her second South American title in the event. Over a period of five months, she improved her best from 14.30 to 14.99 right before the World Championships, in Daegu.

In the Korean city she stayed consistent over 14.80, with a bronze-winning 14.84, to join race walker Luis Fernando López – who had also won bronze days earlier – as the first Colombians to reach the podium at the World Championships.

“I had high expectations and things went as expected. I thank God and I would like to dedicate this medal to Colombia. I have had a long career, this is my first major performance. It is never too late and I hope similar results on the global stage will follow,” said a smiling Ibargüen as she celebrated her feat.

She capped a magic season by claiming gold at the Pan American Games in Guadalajara, Mexico – Colombia’s first ever medal  in a women’s field event in the Games and the first ever overall gold in field events. Thanks to all those achievements, Ibargüen was named Colombia’s sportsperson of 2011 by the national newspaper “El Espectador”.

“It was truly a great year. I felt more eager after each improvement, which was also a confirmation of the great work we were doing. And I was also thinking that I always had more margin to continue to better my marks. However, the goal for us was to improve the technique, and to reach a certain level of consistency; we weren’t just focusing on the performances. The season was great from the first until the last competition. I couldn’t have done it without the great coach I have, or without the great conditions in which we train,” she reflected.

Judging from her 2012 season so far, Ibargüen is ready for something big at the London Olympics. At home, she improved her Long Jump national record to 6.73 and set a world leading 14.95 in her first Triple Jump competition of the year.

She ranks second on the world lists ahead of the Olympics behind Ukraine’s world and European champion Olha Saladuha (14.99) and ended her pre-Olympic campaign with two Diamond League wins in London and Monaco (where she registered the third best mark of 2012).

Based on her consistency, Ibargüen is convinced she is ready to jump 15 meters to win an Olympic medal. “That’s what will be needed to win a medal. I am confident and relaxed,” she commented. “I feel no pressure. I am taking it (the Olympics) with a cool mind and will do my best as usual (in London)”, she added.

Ibargüen defines herself as “a fighter, persistent and friendly”. She gives a lot of credit to coaches Sandrino and Duany for her success. “Regla (Sandrino) is like a mother to me. If I have come this far is because she taught me to fight until the end. I now have another father, Ubaldo Duany. He is always there not only as a coach but also as a friend, father, psychologist. They are special to me and have positively contributed to my development as a person and as an athlete.”

“Sport was a way out for me. It helps you grow as a person and it gives you the opportunity to meet many people and discover many countries. Thanks to sports, I made my first trip to Bogotá. Today, my family, my coach and representing my country are my main motivation,” she continued.

Off the track, Ibargüen is hoping to finish her career at nursing school at Universidad Metropolitana in 2012. She lives in Puerto Rico with her boyfriend, Colombian hurdler Alexander Ramos who also trains with Duany at the same university. “Alexander is a great part of my life, and gives me a great deal of support.”

 

Personal Bests

200m- 24.96 (2009)

800m- 2:41.53 (2009)

100m hurdles- 14.09 (2011)

High Jump- 1.93 NR (2005)

Long jump- 6.73A NR (2012)

Triple jump- 14.99 AR (2011)

Shot Put- 13.71A (2008)

Javelin- 44.81 (2009)

Heptathlon- 5742 (2009)

 

Yearly Progression

High Jump: 1999-1.76A; 2000- -; 2001-1.79A, 2002-1.81A, 2003-1.86A AJR, 2004-1.91 NR, 2005-1.93 NR, 2006-1.90A, 2007-1.87, 2008-1.88A, 2009-1.88A, 2010-1.80, 2011-1.85

Long Jump: 2001-5.87; 2002-6.08A, 2003-6.18A NJR, 2004-6.42A NR, 2005-6.54A NR, 2006-6.49A/6.52Aw, 2007-6.22/6.23w, 2008-6.54A ENR, 2009-6.41A, 2010-6.29A/6.34w, 2011-6.63A NR, 2012-6.73A NR/6.87W

Triple Jump: 2001-12.90; 2002-13.38A NJR, 2003-13.23A, 2004-13.64A NR, 2005-13.66A NR, 2006-13.91A NR/13.98Aw, 2007-12.66A, 2008-13.79A, 2009-13.96 A NR, 2010-14.29 NR, 2011-14.99A AR, 2012-14.95A

Career Highlights

1999  3rd   South American Championships, Bogotá      (High Jump)     1.76A

2001  1st  Bolivarian Games, Ambato          (High Jump)    1.79A

2001  1st  South American Junior Championships, Santa Fe    (High Jump)     1.77

2001  2nd   South American Junior Championships, Santa Fe    (Long Jump)     5.87

2001  3rd    South American Junior Championships, Santa Fe    (Triple Jump)   12.65

2001  2nd   Pan American Junior Championships, Santa Fe    (High Jump)     1.77

2001  6th    Pan American Junior Championships, Santa Fe    (Long Jump)     5.70

2001  4th     Pan American Junior Championships, Santa Fe    (Triple Jump)   12.90

2002  2nd   Central American and Caribbean Junior Ch., Bridgetown  (High Jump)    1.79

2002  3rd  Central American and Caribbean Junior Ch., Bridgetown  (Triple Jump)  13.01

2002  q  World Junior Championships, Kingston      (Triple Jump)  12.69

2002  3rd   Central American and Caribbean Games, San Salvador  (High Jump)    1.79

2002  3rd  Central American and Caribbean Games, San Salvador  (Triple Jump)  13.17

2003  1st   South American Junior Championships, Guayaquil    (High Jump)    1.80

2003  1st   South American Junior Championships, Guayaquil    (Triple Jump)  13.05

2003  4th   South American Championships, Barquisimeto    (High Jump)    1.79

2003  2nd  South American Championships, Barquisimeto    (Long Jump)    6.04

2003  3rd  South American Championships, Barquisimeto    (Triple Jump)  13.07

2003  4th    Pan American Junior Championships, Bridgetown    (High Jump)    1.81

2003  4th    Pan American Junior Championships, Bridgetown    (Triple Jump)  12.64

2004  1st   South American U23 Championships, Barquisimeto    (High Jump)    1.91

2004  2nd    South American U23 Championships, Barquisimeto    (Long Jump)    6.05

2004  3rd  Iberoamerican Championships, Huelva      (High Jump)    1.88

2004  q  Olympic Games, Athens          (High Jump)    1.85

2005  1st  South American Championships, Cali      (High Jump)    1.93

2005  3rd  South American Championships, Cali      (Long Jump)    6.30

2005  3rd  South American Championships, Cali      (Triple Jump)  13.59

2005  q  World Championships, Helsinki        (High Jump)    1.84 

2005  1st  Bolivarian Games, Armenia          (High Jump)    1.91A

2005  1st  Bolivarian Games, Armenia          (Long Jump)    6.54A 

2005  1st  Bolivarian Games, Armenia          (Triple Jump)  13.64A

2006  q  World Indoor Championships, Moscow      (High Jump)    1.81

2006  2nd  Central American and Caribbean Games, Cartagena  (High Jump)    1.88

2006  1st  South American Championships, Tunja      (High Jump)    1.90A

2006  2nd  South American Championships, Tunja      (Long Jump)    6.51A

2006  2nd  South American Championships, Tunja      (Triple Jump)  13.91A

2006  2nd  South American U23 Championships, Buenos Aires    (High Jump)     1.85

2006  1st  South American U23 Championships, Buenos Aires    (Long Jump)    6.32

2006  2nd  South American U23 Championships, Buenos Aires    (Triple Jump)  13.26

2007  1st  South American Championships, Medellín      (High Jump)    1.84

2007  3rd  South American Championships, Medellín      (Long Jump)    6.18

2007  4th   Pan American Games, Rio de Janeiro      (High Jump)   1.87

2008   2nd   Iberoamerican Championships, Iquique      (High Jump)    1.85

2008  2nd  Central American and Caribbean Championships, Cali  (High Jump)    1.88A

2008  6th   Central American and Caribbean Championships, Cali  (Triple Jump)  13.04A

2009  1st  South American Championships, Lima      (High Jump)    1.88A

2009  1st  South American Championships, Lima      (Triple Jump)  13.93A

2009  1st  Bolivarian Games, Sucre          (High Jump)    1.80A

2009  1st  Bolivarian Games, Sucre          (Long Jump)    6.32A

2009  2nd  Bolivarian Games, Sucre          (Triple Jump)  13.96A

2010  2nd  Iberoamerican Championships, San Fernando    (Triple Jump)  14.29

2010  4th   Central American and Caribbean Games Mayagüez  (Long Jump)    6.29

2010  2nd  Central American and Caribbean Games Mayagüez  (Triple Jump)  14.10

2011  3rd  South American Championships, Buenos Aires    (Long Jump)    6.45

2011  1st  South American Championships, Buenos Aires    (Triple Jump)  14.59

2011  3rd  World Championships  , Daegu        (Triple Jump)  14.84    

2011  3rd  Pan American Games  , Guadalajara        (Long Jump)    6.63A

2011  1st  Pan American Games  , Guadalajara        (Triple Jump)  14.92A

Prepared by Javier Clavelo and Eduardo Biscayart for the IAAF ‘Focus on Athletes’ project. © IAAF 2012

Personal Best - Outdoor
Performance Wind Place Date
High Jump 1.93 Cali 22 JUL 2005
Long Jump 6.73 +1.8 Bogotá 30 JUN 2012
Triple Jump 14.99 +1.7 Bogotá 13 AUG 2011
Heptathlon 5742 San Germán 05 DEC 2009
Personal Best - Indoor
Performance Wind Place Date
High Jump 1.81 Moskva (Olimpiyskiy Stadion) 11 MAR 2006
Progression - Outdoor showShow All Graphs
High Jump Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2011 1.85 Ponce 15 APR
2009 1.88 Lima 20 JUN
2008 1.88 Uberlândia 11 MAY
2008 1.88 Medellín 26 APR
2007 1.87 Rio de Janeiro 25 JUL
2006 1.90 Tunja 01 OCT
2005 1.93 Cali 22 JUL
2004 1.91 Barquisimeto 27 JUN
2003 1.86 Medellín 26 JUL
2002 1.81 Medellín 12 OCT
2001 1.79 Ambato 13 SEP
1999 1.65 Bydgoszcz 16 JUL
Long Jump Show Graphshow
Performance Wind Place Date
2013 6.54 Cali 22 JUN
2012 6.73 +1.8 Bogotá 30 JUN
2011 6.63 +1.6 Guadalajara, MEX 26 OCT
2009 6.41 +0.2 Bogotá 23 MAY
2008 6.54 +1.5 Bogotá 19 JUL
2006 6.49 +1.7 Bogotá 15 JUL
2005 6.54 +0.7 Armenia 20 AUG
2004 6.42 +1.4 Bogotá 05 DEC
2003 6.18 Bogotá 13 JUL
Triple Jump Show Graphshow
Performance Wind Place Date
2013 14.85 +0.2 Moskva (Luzhniki) 15 AUG
2012 14.95 +0.9 Medellín 28 APR
2011 14.99 +1.7 Bogotá 13 AUG
2010 14.29 +2.0 San Fernando 05 JUN
2009 13.96 -0.3 Sucre 24 NOV
2008 13.79 +0.7 Bogotá 19 JUL
2006 13.91 -0.9 Tunja 29 SEP
2005 13.66 -0.8 Bogotá 02 JUL
2004 13.64 -1.0 Bogotá 03 DEC
2003 13.71 Medellín 04 MAY
2002 13.38 Bogotá 30 JUN
2001 12.90 -1.2 Medellín 23 SEP
Heptathlon Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2010 5633 San Germán 04 DEC
2009 5742 San Germán 05 DEC
Progression - Indoor showShow All Graphs
High Jump Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2006 1.81 Moskva (Olimpiyskiy Stadion) 11 MAR
Honours - High Jump
Rank Mark Wind Place Date
12th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 15q1 1.85 Berlin 18 AUG 2009
11th IAAF World Indoor Championships 17q1 1.81 Moskva (Olimpiyskiy Stadion) 11 MAR 2006
10th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 11q1 1.84 Helsinki 06 AUG 2005
28th Olympic Games 16q2 1.85 Athína (Olympic Stadium) 26 AUG 2004
1st IAAF World Youth Championships 15q1 1.65 Bydgoszcz 16 JUL 1999
Honours - Long Jump
Rank Mark Wind Place Date
The XXX Olympic Games q2 DNS London (OP) 07 AUG 2012
Honours - Triple Jump
Rank Mark Wind Place Date
14th IAAF World Championships 1 14.85 +0.2 Moskva (Luzhniki) 15 AUG 2013
The XXX Olympic Games 2 14.80 +0.4 London (OP) 05 AUG 2012
13th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 3 14.84 +0.4 Daegu 01 SEP 2011
IAAF/Coca Cola World Junior Championships 9q1 12.69 +0.6 Kingston, JAM 16 JUL 2002


Focus on Athletes biographies are produced by the IAAF Communications Dept, and not by the IAAF Statistics and Documentation Division. If you have any enquiries concerning the information, please use the Contact IAAF page, selecting ‘Focus on Athletes Biographies’ in the drop down menu of contact area options.


Created 29 July 2012

 

Caterine IBARGÜEN Mena, Colombia (Long Jump/Triple Jump)

Born 12 February 1984 in Apartadó, Antioquia

1.81m, 65Kg

Coach: Ubaldo Duany (CUB)

 

Twenty years after Ximena Restrepo’s historic bronze medal at the 1992 Barcelona Games, Colombia is dreaming again of another Olympic medal in athletics, thanks to Caterine Ibargüen.

Born in Antioquia’s sub-region of Urabá, an area that’s well known for its banana plantations, Ibargüen was raised by her grandmother Ayola Rivas after her parents broke up. Her mother Francisca worked as a cook in gold mines in Antioquia and her father William settled in neighbouring Venezuela.

She began playing volleyball before taking up athletics at the age of 12 in her hometown of Apartadó. She was then invited to move to Medellín, the capital of Antioquia, to continue training there, where more resources were available.

“My first coach was Wilder Zapata. He discovered me at my school. I began at High Jump in 1996, when I was moved to Medellín’s “Villa Deportiva” – a high performance centre.” There she began training under Cuban coach Jorge Luis Alfaro, who was also training South American record holder Gilmar Mayo, and focused on the High Jump.

In 1999, aged only 15, Ibargüen won her first medal at the senior South American Championships, taking bronze with 1.76. In 2000, she continued to train with another Cuban coach, Regla Sandrino. “I guess that’s when I consolidated myself at the event,” she recalled.

A year later, she savoured her first international win at the Bolivarian Games in Ambato, Ecuador, in September and then contested the High Jump, Long Jump and Triple Jump at both the South American Junior Championships – where she medalled in each event – and at the Pan American Junior Championships – where she was second in the High Jump and a finalist in the other events.

In 2002, she improved in the Triple Jump, setting a national junior record of 13.38. She combined the two events and won medals in both at the Central American and Caribbean Junior Championships in Barbados and the CAC Games in San Salvador.

In between, she had her first global experience when she contested the Triple Jump at the World Junior Championships, in Kingston, but failed to qualify to the final.

Her focus remained on the High Jump, where in 2003 she set the national record and equalled the South American junior record with 1.86m as well as national junior record in the Long Jump with 6.18A.

She improved her record to 1.91m in 2004 to make the Colombian team for the Olympic Games in Athens at the age of 20 but did not make it past the qualifications. At the National Games at the end of the year, she also set her first national records in the Long Jump (6.42A) and Triple Jump (13.64A).

Ibargüen consolidated herself as the region’s top High Jumper as she collected two South American Junior titles (2001 and 2003) and five South American titles in a row (U23 in 2004 and 2006,  Senior in 2005-2007). In 2005, she reached her best of 1.93 and contested her first World Championships in Helsinki, but again failed to make it to the final.

The following year, she contested her first and so far only competition indoors at the World Indoor Championships in Moscow. But her results stalled and after failing to qualify to the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, she felt she needed a change in her career.

“When I failed to qualify for the 2008 Games, I felt depressed, like I wanted to quit the sport. That’s when I move to Puerto Rico – at the end of 2008 – to study at the “Universidad Metropolitana”. The idea was to set the focus in the Triple Jump and Heptathlon, under the guidance of Ubaldo Duany.”

Cuba’s Duany, an 8.32 Long Jumper (1986) and 1989 World Indoor finalist, saw that Ibargüen’s potential in the High Jump was limited, due to how her body had changed over the years. When she obtained her scholarship to study nursing in Puerto Rico, Duany sat down to trace a plan for her, more adapted to her potential.

“I knew it would be hard to keep improving in the High Jump, as she had developed more muscular mass in her lower extremities. I figured that she would have to lose weight in order to jump higher. So, with that in mind, I understood she would do much better at Long and Triple, even with the chance of competing at high level,” recalled Duany.

“When I decided to move to Puerto Rico, I was determined to make the most of it. I wanted to study and work hard with Coach Duany. He knew me well, and although I had done Triple Jump before, we needed to correct the major technical mistakes I was carrying,” explained Ibargüen. “We had to start from scratch, and I used to wonder, ‘When am I going to dominate this event?’ It was pretty hard for me, but I always remained optimistic, thanks to the support of a great coach, who is very positive,” she added.

2010 marked her first tests of fire and she soon started to see progress as a Triple Jump specialist. She picked up silver behind World champion Yargelis Savigne at the Iberoamerican Championships with a national record of 14.29. A month and a half later, she added a silver at the Central American Games, in Puerto Rico.   “I guess those results left us (my coach and myself), much more positive for the future,” commented the young Colombian.

The stage was set for a breakthrough in 2011. In 13 finals she contested, Ibargüen improved or equalled the Colombian Triple Jump record on seven occasions, and the South American mark on four. In the process, she collected her second South American title in the event. Over a period of five months, she improved her best from 14.30 to 14.99 right before the World Championships, in Daegu.

In the Korean city she stayed consistent over 14.80, with a bronze-winning 14.84, to join race walker Luis Fernando López – who had also won bronze days earlier – as the first Colombians to reach the podium at the World Championships.

“I had high expectations and things went as expected. I thank God and I would like to dedicate this medal to Colombia. I have had a long career, this is my first major performance. It is never too late and I hope similar results on the global stage will follow,” said a smiling Ibargüen as she celebrated her feat.

She capped a magic season by claiming gold at the Pan American Games in Guadalajara, Mexico – Colombia’s first ever medal  in a women’s field event in the Games and the first ever overall gold in field events. Thanks to all those achievements, Ibargüen was named Colombia’s sportsperson of 2011 by the national newspaper “El Espectador”.

“It was truly a great year. I felt more eager after each improvement, which was also a confirmation of the great work we were doing. And I was also thinking that I always had more margin to continue to better my marks. However, the goal for us was to improve the technique, and to reach a certain level of consistency; we weren’t just focusing on the performances. The season was great from the first until the last competition. I couldn’t have done it without the great coach I have, or without the great conditions in which we train,” she reflected.

Judging from her 2012 season so far, Ibargüen is ready for something big at the London Olympics. At home, she improved her Long Jump national record to 6.73 and set a world leading 14.95 in her first Triple Jump competition of the year.

She ranks second on the world lists ahead of the Olympics behind Ukraine’s world and European champion Olha Saladuha (14.99) and ended her pre-Olympic campaign with two Diamond League wins in London and Monaco (where she registered the third best mark of 2012).

Based on her consistency, Ibargüen is convinced she is ready to jump 15 meters to win an Olympic medal. “That’s what will be needed to win a medal. I am confident and relaxed,” she commented. “I feel no pressure. I am taking it (the Olympics) with a cool mind and will do my best as usual (in London)”, she added.

Ibargüen defines herself as “a fighter, persistent and friendly”. She gives a lot of credit to coaches Sandrino and Duany for her success. “Regla (Sandrino) is like a mother to me. If I have come this far is because she taught me to fight until the end. I now have another father, Ubaldo Duany. He is always there not only as a coach but also as a friend, father, psychologist. They are special to me and have positively contributed to my development as a person and as an athlete.”

“Sport was a way out for me. It helps you grow as a person and it gives you the opportunity to meet many people and discover many countries. Thanks to sports, I made my first trip to Bogotá. Today, my family, my coach and representing my country are my main motivation,” she continued.

Off the track, Ibargüen is hoping to finish her career at nursing school at Universidad Metropolitana in 2012. She lives in Puerto Rico with her boyfriend, Colombian hurdler Alexander Ramos who also trains with Duany at the same university. “Alexander is a great part of my life, and gives me a great deal of support.”

 

Personal Bests

200m- 24.96 (2009)

800m- 2:41.53 (2009)

100m hurdles- 14.09 (2011)

High Jump- 1.93 NR (2005)

Long jump- 6.73A NR (2012)

Triple jump- 14.99 AR (2011)

Shot Put- 13.71A (2008)

Javelin- 44.81 (2009)

Heptathlon- 5742 (2009)

 

Yearly Progression

High Jump: 1999-1.76A; 2000- -; 2001-1.79A, 2002-1.81A, 2003-1.86A AJR, 2004-1.91 NR, 2005-1.93 NR, 2006-1.90A, 2007-1.87, 2008-1.88A, 2009-1.88A, 2010-1.80, 2011-1.85

Long Jump: 2001-5.87; 2002-6.08A, 2003-6.18A NJR, 2004-6.42A NR, 2005-6.54A NR, 2006-6.49A/6.52Aw, 2007-6.22/6.23w, 2008-6.54A ENR, 2009-6.41A, 2010-6.29A/6.34w, 2011-6.63A NR, 2012-6.73A NR/6.87W

Triple Jump: 2001-12.90; 2002-13.38A NJR, 2003-13.23A, 2004-13.64A NR, 2005-13.66A NR, 2006-13.91A NR/13.98Aw, 2007-12.66A, 2008-13.79A, 2009-13.96 A NR, 2010-14.29 NR, 2011-14.99A AR, 2012-14.95A

Career Highlights

1999  3rd   South American Championships, Bogotá      (High Jump)     1.76A

2001  1st  Bolivarian Games, Ambato          (High Jump)    1.79A

2001  1st  South American Junior Championships, Santa Fe    (High Jump)     1.77

2001  2nd   South American Junior Championships, Santa Fe    (Long Jump)     5.87

2001  3rd    South American Junior Championships, Santa Fe    (Triple Jump)   12.65

2001  2nd   Pan American Junior Championships, Santa Fe    (High Jump)     1.77

2001  6th    Pan American Junior Championships, Santa Fe    (Long Jump)     5.70

2001  4th     Pan American Junior Championships, Santa Fe    (Triple Jump)   12.90

2002  2nd   Central American and Caribbean Junior Ch., Bridgetown  (High Jump)    1.79

2002  3rd  Central American and Caribbean Junior Ch., Bridgetown  (Triple Jump)  13.01

2002  q  World Junior Championships, Kingston      (Triple Jump)  12.69

2002  3rd   Central American and Caribbean Games, San Salvador  (High Jump)    1.79

2002  3rd  Central American and Caribbean Games, San Salvador  (Triple Jump)  13.17

2003  1st   South American Junior Championships, Guayaquil    (High Jump)    1.80

2003  1st   South American Junior Championships, Guayaquil    (Triple Jump)  13.05

2003  4th   South American Championships, Barquisimeto    (High Jump)    1.79

2003  2nd  South American Championships, Barquisimeto    (Long Jump)    6.04

2003  3rd  South American Championships, Barquisimeto    (Triple Jump)  13.07

2003  4th    Pan American Junior Championships, Bridgetown    (High Jump)    1.81

2003  4th    Pan American Junior Championships, Bridgetown    (Triple Jump)  12.64

2004  1st   South American U23 Championships, Barquisimeto    (High Jump)    1.91

2004  2nd    South American U23 Championships, Barquisimeto    (Long Jump)    6.05

2004  3rd  Iberoamerican Championships, Huelva      (High Jump)    1.88

2004  q  Olympic Games, Athens          (High Jump)    1.85

2005  1st  South American Championships, Cali      (High Jump)    1.93

2005  3rd  South American Championships, Cali      (Long Jump)    6.30

2005  3rd  South American Championships, Cali      (Triple Jump)  13.59

2005  q  World Championships, Helsinki        (High Jump)    1.84 

2005  1st  Bolivarian Games, Armenia          (High Jump)    1.91A

2005  1st  Bolivarian Games, Armenia          (Long Jump)    6.54A 

2005  1st  Bolivarian Games, Armenia          (Triple Jump)  13.64A

2006  q  World Indoor Championships, Moscow      (High Jump)    1.81

2006  2nd  Central American and Caribbean Games, Cartagena  (High Jump)    1.88

2006  1st  South American Championships, Tunja      (High Jump)    1.90A

2006  2nd  South American Championships, Tunja      (Long Jump)    6.51A

2006  2nd  South American Championships, Tunja      (Triple Jump)  13.91A

2006  2nd  South American U23 Championships, Buenos Aires    (High Jump)     1.85

2006  1st  South American U23 Championships, Buenos Aires    (Long Jump)    6.32

2006  2nd  South American U23 Championships, Buenos Aires    (Triple Jump)  13.26

2007  1st  South American Championships, Medellín      (High Jump)    1.84

2007  3rd  South American Championships, Medellín      (Long Jump)    6.18

2007  4th   Pan American Games, Rio de Janeiro      (High Jump)   1.87

2008   2nd   Iberoamerican Championships, Iquique      (High Jump)    1.85

2008  2nd  Central American and Caribbean Championships, Cali  (High Jump)    1.88A

2008  6th   Central American and Caribbean Championships, Cali  (Triple Jump)  13.04A

2009  1st  South American Championships, Lima      (High Jump)    1.88A

2009  1st  South American Championships, Lima      (Triple Jump)  13.93A

2009  1st  Bolivarian Games, Sucre          (High Jump)    1.80A

2009  1st  Bolivarian Games, Sucre          (Long Jump)    6.32A

2009  2nd  Bolivarian Games, Sucre          (Triple Jump)  13.96A

2010  2nd  Iberoamerican Championships, San Fernando    (Triple Jump)  14.29

2010  4th   Central American and Caribbean Games Mayagüez  (Long Jump)    6.29

2010  2nd  Central American and Caribbean Games Mayagüez  (Triple Jump)  14.10

2011  3rd  South American Championships, Buenos Aires    (Long Jump)    6.45

2011  1st  South American Championships, Buenos Aires    (Triple Jump)  14.59

2011  3rd  World Championships  , Daegu        (Triple Jump)  14.84    

2011  3rd  Pan American Games  , Guadalajara        (Long Jump)    6.63A

2011  1st  Pan American Games  , Guadalajara        (Triple Jump)  14.92A

Prepared by Javier Clavelo and Eduardo Biscayart for the IAAF ‘Focus on Athletes’ project. © IAAF 2012