Athlete Profile

Víctor Moya

  • COUNTRY Cuba Cuba
  • DATE OF BIRTH 24 OCT 1982
Victor Moya celebrates his 2.35m win in Monaco (AFP/Getty Images)
Victor Moya celebrates his 2.35m win in Monaco (AFP/Getty Images)
  • COUNTRY Cuba Cuba
  • DATE OF BIRTH 24 OCT 1982


Focus on Athletes biographies are produced by the IAAF Communications Dept, and not by the IAAF Statistics and Documentation Division. If you have any enquiries concerning the information, please use the Contact IAAF page, selecting ‘Focus on Athletes Biographies’ in the drop down menu of contact area options.


Updated 28 February 2008

Víctor Rafael MOYA Carvajal, Cuba (High Jump)
 
Born 24 October 1982, Santiago de Cuba; 1.94m / 80kg 

Manager: Javier Sotomayor; Coach: Bárbaro Diaz


As a young boy, Victor Moya had wanted to be a sprinter. “But I began to grow up and lost speed,” Moya recalled. “So I turned to combined events in school and took up the high jump at the age of 14.”

It was while Moya was participating in physical education in school that his sports teacher discovered his potential for the vertical jumps. At first he was first coached by former national record holder Luis E. Milanés and his second coach, former national record holder Marima Rodríguez (1.83m in 1972), taught him to jump aggressively.

After clearing 2.10, Moya joined the national team in 2001, the year that world record holder Javier Sotomayor retired. In 2002 he made his international debut, with 8th place at the 2002 Ibero-American Championships, in Guatemala. In 2003 and 2004, he was in the shadow of Lisvany Pérez, the sole Cuban high jumper in the Pan American Games, in Santo Domingo, and at the Olympic Games, in Athens.

In 2005, Moya became the revelation of Cuban athletics. He took part in 23 competitions and improved from 2.25 to 2.35. He was his country’s choice for the World Championships, in Helsinki, after beating Perez at the Central American and Caribbean Championships, in Nassau. Both had jumped 2.29 and were just one centimetre short of the IAAF A standard (2.30), which would have allowed both to enter. “It was very sad to see Lisvany out of team,” Moya said. “Both of us dreamed of Helsinki.”

Moya’s magic year continued after his surprising silver medal (2.29) in Helsinki, where, at 22, he became the fourth Cuban high jumper to win a World Championship medal. The others are Sotomayor (six world titles, four indoors and two out), Ioamnet Quintero and Silvia Costa (women’s gold and silver medallists respectively, in Stuttgart, in 1993). A week later, in Eberstadt, he became the fourth Cuban ever to clear 2.30.

A podium place in the Finnish capital opened doors for Moya to the big European meetings. In Zürich he jumped a rain-soaked 2.28 for 2nd, then came the 2.30 in Eberstadt (2nd),  then three more 2.30-plus performances: Brussels 2.31 (his first Golden League victory), Berlin 2.30 (2nd) and his  win at the World Athletics Final, in Monaco.

In the closing stages of the competition in Monaco, Moya cleared a PB 2.32 on his third attempt, but was still out of the medals. Then a first-attempt clearance at 2.35 moved him from fourth to first place and gave him the meeting record.

These results propelled Moya up the IAAF World Rankings from 51st in 2004 to 3rd. He also moved up to 2nd in the all-time national list, behind Sotomayor’s world mark of 2.45. (Marino Drake cleared 2.34 in 1991 and Juan Francisco Centelles 2.32 in 1983).

Indoors, Moya made his debut in 2005 with a short tour of four competitions in Europe. His best was 2.21. He improved to 2.30 to finish fourth at the 2006 IAAF World Indoor Championships, in Moscow.

In 2006, he saw his outdoor season curtailed due to illness and he could not achieve his two major goals of the year: the Central American and Caribbean Games in Cartagena de Indias, Colombia, and the World Cup in Athens.

In 2007, Moya has improved his indoor PB to 2.31 and recovered in time from a minor pain in his take-off leg to claim the Pan American gold in Rio de Janeiro. However, he could not repeat the podium position from Helsinki as he finished equal fifth (2.30) at the World Championships, in Osaka.

In the winter of 2008, Moya has already cleared 2.30 in the very competitive indoor season. He knows he has to be close to or at his best to win a medal in Valencia. It will be his second World Indoor Championships.
 
Fond of a particular Santiago de Cuba conga, performed by the Surcaribe band, Moya plays it for inspiration during contests in Europe. He is the second of four children (two boys and two twin girls). His father, Victor Manuel Moya, an electrical engineer, competed in high jump at the National Youth Games in the 1970s. His mother, Juana Pilar, is a physiotherapist.


Personal Bests

2.35 (2005); 2.31i (2007)


Yearly Progression

2001 - 2.10; 2002 - 2.21; 2003 - 2.18; 2004 - 2.25; 2005 - 2.35; 2006 - 2.31; 2007 - 2.33; 2008-2.30i


Career highlights

2005 1st  Central American and Caribbean Championships
2005  2nd  World Championships
2005 1st  World Athletics Final
2006 4th  World Indoor Championships 
2007  1st  Pan American Games
2007   5th       World Championships   


Prepared by Javier Clavelo for the IAAF.’Focus on Athletes’ project. Copyright IAAF 2008.

Personal Best - Outdoor
Performance Wind Place Date
High Jump 2.35 Monaco 10 SEP 2005
Personal Best - Indoor
Performance Wind Place Date
High Jump 2.31 Arnstadt 03 FEB 2007
Progression - Outdoor showShow All Graphs
High Jump Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2014 2.10 La Habana (Estadio Panamericano) 08 MAR
2013 2.20 La Habana (Estadio Panamericano) 09 MAR
2013 2.20 La Habana (Estadio Panamericano) 22 FEB
2012 2.22 La Habana (Estadio Panamericano) 22 JUN
2011 2.28 Barquisimeto 29 JUL
2010 2.15 La Habana (Estadio Panamericano) 21 MAR
2008 2.30 Eberstadt 29 JUN
2007 2.33 Alcalá de Henares 07 JUL
2006 2.31 La Habana 25 MAR
2005 2.35 Monaco 10 SEP
2004 2.25 La Habana 20 FEB
2002 2.21 La Habana 01 DEC
2002 2.21 La Habana 14 FEB
Progression - Indoor showShow All Graphs
High Jump Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2011 2.20 Bydgoszcz 16 FEB
2011 2.20 Moskva 06 FEB
2008 2.30 Banská Bystrica 05 FEB
2007 2.31 Arnstadt 03 FEB
2006 2.30 Moskva (Olimpiyskiy Stadion) 11 MAR
2005 2.23 Weinheim 23 FEB
2005 2.23 Peanía 20 FEB
Honours - High Jump
Rank Mark Wind Place Date
The XXX Olympic Games 10q2 2.21 London (OP) 05 AUG 2012
13th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 16q1 2.21 Daegu 30 AUG 2011
12th IAAF World Indoor Championships 5 2.27 Valencia, ESP 08 MAR 2008
11th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 5 2.30 Osaka (Nagai Stadium) 29 AUG 2007
11th IAAF World Indoor Championships 4 2.30 Moskva (Olimpiyskiy Stadion) 11 MAR 2006
3rd IAAF World Athletics Final 1 2.35 Monaco 10 SEP 2005
10th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 2 2.29 Helsinki 14 AUG 2005


Focus on Athletes biographies are produced by the IAAF Communications Dept, and not by the IAAF Statistics and Documentation Division. If you have any enquiries concerning the information, please use the Contact IAAF page, selecting ‘Focus on Athletes Biographies’ in the drop down menu of contact area options.


Updated 28 February 2008

Víctor Rafael MOYA Carvajal, Cuba (High Jump)
 
Born 24 October 1982, Santiago de Cuba; 1.94m / 80kg 

Manager: Javier Sotomayor; Coach: Bárbaro Diaz


As a young boy, Victor Moya had wanted to be a sprinter. “But I began to grow up and lost speed,” Moya recalled. “So I turned to combined events in school and took up the high jump at the age of 14.”

It was while Moya was participating in physical education in school that his sports teacher discovered his potential for the vertical jumps. At first he was first coached by former national record holder Luis E. Milanés and his second coach, former national record holder Marima Rodríguez (1.83m in 1972), taught him to jump aggressively.

After clearing 2.10, Moya joined the national team in 2001, the year that world record holder Javier Sotomayor retired. In 2002 he made his international debut, with 8th place at the 2002 Ibero-American Championships, in Guatemala. In 2003 and 2004, he was in the shadow of Lisvany Pérez, the sole Cuban high jumper in the Pan American Games, in Santo Domingo, and at the Olympic Games, in Athens.

In 2005, Moya became the revelation of Cuban athletics. He took part in 23 competitions and improved from 2.25 to 2.35. He was his country’s choice for the World Championships, in Helsinki, after beating Perez at the Central American and Caribbean Championships, in Nassau. Both had jumped 2.29 and were just one centimetre short of the IAAF A standard (2.30), which would have allowed both to enter. “It was very sad to see Lisvany out of team,” Moya said. “Both of us dreamed of Helsinki.”

Moya’s magic year continued after his surprising silver medal (2.29) in Helsinki, where, at 22, he became the fourth Cuban high jumper to win a World Championship medal. The others are Sotomayor (six world titles, four indoors and two out), Ioamnet Quintero and Silvia Costa (women’s gold and silver medallists respectively, in Stuttgart, in 1993). A week later, in Eberstadt, he became the fourth Cuban ever to clear 2.30.

A podium place in the Finnish capital opened doors for Moya to the big European meetings. In Zürich he jumped a rain-soaked 2.28 for 2nd, then came the 2.30 in Eberstadt (2nd),  then three more 2.30-plus performances: Brussels 2.31 (his first Golden League victory), Berlin 2.30 (2nd) and his  win at the World Athletics Final, in Monaco.

In the closing stages of the competition in Monaco, Moya cleared a PB 2.32 on his third attempt, but was still out of the medals. Then a first-attempt clearance at 2.35 moved him from fourth to first place and gave him the meeting record.

These results propelled Moya up the IAAF World Rankings from 51st in 2004 to 3rd. He also moved up to 2nd in the all-time national list, behind Sotomayor’s world mark of 2.45. (Marino Drake cleared 2.34 in 1991 and Juan Francisco Centelles 2.32 in 1983).

Indoors, Moya made his debut in 2005 with a short tour of four competitions in Europe. His best was 2.21. He improved to 2.30 to finish fourth at the 2006 IAAF World Indoor Championships, in Moscow.

In 2006, he saw his outdoor season curtailed due to illness and he could not achieve his two major goals of the year: the Central American and Caribbean Games in Cartagena de Indias, Colombia, and the World Cup in Athens.

In 2007, Moya has improved his indoor PB to 2.31 and recovered in time from a minor pain in his take-off leg to claim the Pan American gold in Rio de Janeiro. However, he could not repeat the podium position from Helsinki as he finished equal fifth (2.30) at the World Championships, in Osaka.

In the winter of 2008, Moya has already cleared 2.30 in the very competitive indoor season. He knows he has to be close to or at his best to win a medal in Valencia. It will be his second World Indoor Championships.
 
Fond of a particular Santiago de Cuba conga, performed by the Surcaribe band, Moya plays it for inspiration during contests in Europe. He is the second of four children (two boys and two twin girls). His father, Victor Manuel Moya, an electrical engineer, competed in high jump at the National Youth Games in the 1970s. His mother, Juana Pilar, is a physiotherapist.


Personal Bests

2.35 (2005); 2.31i (2007)


Yearly Progression

2001 - 2.10; 2002 - 2.21; 2003 - 2.18; 2004 - 2.25; 2005 - 2.35; 2006 - 2.31; 2007 - 2.33; 2008-2.30i


Career highlights

2005 1st  Central American and Caribbean Championships
2005  2nd  World Championships
2005 1st  World Athletics Final
2006 4th  World Indoor Championships 
2007  1st  Pan American Games
2007   5th       World Championships   


Prepared by Javier Clavelo for the IAAF.’Focus on Athletes’ project. Copyright IAAF 2008.