Athlete Profile

Mohsen Mohamed Anani

  • COUNTRY Egypt Egypt
  • DATE OF BIRTH 21 MAY 1985
African Hammer Throw champion Mohsen Anani of Egypt (Ghada Abd Elkader)
African Hammer Throw champion Mohsen Anani of Egypt (Ghada Abd Elkader)
  • COUNTRY Egypt Egypt
  • DATE OF BIRTH 21 MAY 1985


Focus on Athletes biographies are produced by the IAAF Communications Dept, and not by the IAAF Statistics and Documentation Division. If you have any enquiries concerning the information, please use the Contact IAAF page, selecting ‘Focus on Athletes Biographies’ in the drop down menu of contact area options.


Created August 16 2010

Mohsen ANANI, Egypt (Hammer Throw)

Born 21 May 1985, Tunis
1.87m / 117kg
Coach: Nagy Assad
Mother Tunisian, father Egyptian. Brother Sadok, born in 1982 is a javelin thrower (71.50m PB in 2009)

Egypt’s Mohsen Anani is asserting himself as the leader of hammer throw in Africa, ending a decade-long domination by South Africa’s Chris Harmse.

The son of an Egyptian father and a Tunisian mother, Mohsen was born in Tunis, where he spent his early life. His mother, a former long jumper, encouraged her 2 sons to try athletics, but Mohsen wasn’t interested. Things changed when he saw his brother Sadok starting to win Tunisia’s youth titles and he decided to give it a try too. Following in his brother’s footsteps, Mohsen started with the javelin, but it became rapidly clear he had no potential in the event.

In December 1998, the family moved back to Egypt. Mohsen switched to the shot put but didn’t experience good feelings with that event either. His brother then told him “Why don’t you try the hammer?” and a career was launched. “From the first day, I knew, this is my event,” Mohsen remembers.

Things then went quite fast for the younger Anani who broke the Egyptian youth record after only three months of training and earned his first selection in the national team.  After the 1999 national youth championships he was recruited by former African shot put champion Nagy Assad, who was by then setting up a throwing school in Egypt that also included discus thrower Omar el Ghazaly and shot putter Yasser Fathy. The young Mohsen was very proud to be part of it.

The first regional medals came quickly. In 2000, Anani placed 3rd at the Pan Arab Junior Championships in Damascus (51.41m) and in 2001 he was 2nd at the African Junior Championships in Mauritius (57.11m), with the senior implement in both cases. But his first outings on the world scene turned out to be frustrating experiences. The young thrower was among the top 6 entrants at the 2001 World Youth Championships in Debrecen, but couldn’t do better than 65.38m, finishing 19th and failing to advance to the final – a big disappointment. 

The following year he threw 71.40m, with the 6kg implement in April in Cairo but recorded 3 fouls at the World Juniors in Kingston. His coach tried to comfort him explaining he was still young and would still have the opportunity to compete another time at the World Juniors, as he was only 17. He then took 2nd place at the Arab Junior Championships in Cairo in September (70.04m – 6kg) behind Kuwait’s Ali Al-Zankawi, who is still dominating the event on the Arab scene at the moment.

In 2003, Anani became African junior champion in Garoua, Cameroon (68.41m - 6kg) and improved his best with the 6kg to 75.71m. Alongside his junior career he also started to draw attention to himself in the senior ranks. Early September, he placed 4th at the Arab Championships (68.30m). He then defeated the national champion for the first time, claiming his first national title (68.79m), which earned him a selection for the All Africa Games in Abuja, Nigeria, in October, where he placed 5th (67.24m)

2004 was a major year for Anani’s career, with a second participation at the World Junior Championships. He came to Grosseto with a 77.23m best, and this time the young Egyptian lived up to his promises, claiming a silver medal thanks to a 72.98m effort. Early August he went above 70m with the senior implement for the first time (70.41m on 5 August in Cairo) and set a new African junior record with the senior implement (72.50m) on 22 August in Cairo. In October, he clinched a silver medal at the Pan Arab Games in Algiers (71.65m). The season wasn’t over yet, as Anani cherished another dream: in his last two months as a junior, he wanted to take a shot at the World junior record that stood at 81.34m. From 22 November to 28 December, he competed at home with the 6kg hammer no fewer than 8 times, coming short of his goal, but eventually improving his national record to 79.56m.

In 2005, for his first year as a senior Anani, managed to qualify for the Helsinki World Championships, setting a national record and a B-qualifier (75.31m) on 22 July, three days before the entry deadline. There, he finished 23rd of the qualifications with 71.78m.  He then moved to the United States, where he was enrolled as a student at Virginia Tech. The programme was supposed to last 4 years, but the Egyptian cut the experience short after a year, because the different training methods did not work out for him. He finished 4th of the NCAA Championships and brought precious points to the team but his performances had dropped from 75m to 68m, a situation that was far from satisfying for an athlete who had much higher ambitions. In summer 2006, he thus came back to Egypt and the Cairo Higher Institute where he graduated in business in 2009. He then placed 3rd at the African Championships in Mauritius (69.22m) before ending his season with 72.00m at the end of August in Cairo.

In 2007, the Egyptian progressively worked his way back to his previous level, recording a performance of 74.57m early July in Cairo. He then travelled to Algiers for the All Africa Games (2nd with 72.00m) and to Bangkok for the World University Games (4th with 72.66), before the World championships in Osaka where he placed 19th in the qualifications (72.93m).  The season was not over, however, with the Pan Arab Games at home at the end of November. Preparing for the event, Anani set a new national record of 76.00m on 8 October. He went on to claim the Arab title in a rare defeat of Kuwait’s Al-Zankawi (74.22m to 74.02m).

2008 started with a good opening (75.20m at the end of February). There were another couple of 73m throws but then the performances dropped around 70 meters. At the Beijing Olympics, Anani suffered from blood pressure problems and had 3 fouls, unable to record a valid throw. 

The following year again started with good performances on home soil (a series of 74.82, 75.97, 75.48, 76.40 in Cairo from March to May, 76.40m being a new national record and the best performance in Africa that season), but there were more difficulties to reach a similar level, during the summer, abroad. There was a 5th place at the Mediterranean Games in Pescara (71.58), a 10th place at the World University Games in Beograd (69.91) and a 20th place at the World Championships in Berlin (72.68). The year however ended on a better note in October with a victory at the Francophone Games in Beirut (71.30m) and a silver medal at the Arab Championships in Damascus (74.31m).

2010 marked a breakthrough as his new national record of 77.36m, set on 29 March, propelled him for the first time in the world Top 20 of the year (at the end of August, Anani is ranked 19th). The Egyptian also clinched his first continental crown (74.72m at the African Championships in Nairobi), ending a decade-long domination by South African veteran Chris Harmse and earning his first selection to represent Africa at the Continental Cup.

Anani is now hoping to get more opportunities to compete abroad and to take part to the Hammer Throw World Challenge next year and is very confident he can make the final at the 2011 World Championships in Daegu.

Unlike many athletes, Mohsen Anani rarely leaves his training base in Cairo.  “I don’t like training camps. Training camps are not working for me,” says the Egyptian, who points out that his country offers very good weather conditions throughout the year.

When he is not training, Anani enjoys spending time drawing, hanging out with friends and watching movies, especially horror movies.

Personal Best
77.36 (2010)

Yearly Progression
2000: 51.41; 2001: 58.65; 2002: 63.11 / 71.40 (6kg); 2003: 68.79 / 75.71 (6kg); 2004: 72.50 AJR / 79.56 (6kg); 2005: 75.31 NR; 2006: 72.00; 2007: 76.00 NR; 2008: 75.20; 2009: 76.40 NR; 2010: 77.36 NR

Career Highlights
2000    3rd      Arab Junior Championships                (51.41)
2001    2nd     African Junior Championships            (57.11)
2001    q    World Youth Championships                (65.38 - 5kg)
2002    q    World Junior Championships                (NM)
2002    2nd     Arab Junior Championships                (70.04 - 6kg)
2003    1st     African Junior Championships            (68. 41 - 6kg)
2003    4th      Arab Championships                    (68.30)
2003    5th    All Africa Games                    (67.24)
2004   2nd    World Junior Championships                (72.98 - 6kg)
2004    2nd     Pan Arab Games                     (71.65)
2005    4th      Arab Solidarity Games                 (69.50)
2005    8th     Mediterranean Games                (69.83)
2005    q     World Championships                 (71.78)
2006    4th     NCAA Championships                (68.35)
2006    3rd    African Championships                (69.22)
2007    2nd    All Africa Games                     (72.00)
2007    4th    World University Games                (72.66)
2007    q    World Championships                    (72.93)
2007    1st    Pan Arab Games                    (74.22)
2008    q    Olympic Games                     (NM)
2009    5th    Mediterranean Games                 (71.58)
2009    10th     World University Games                (69.91)
2009    q    World Championships                    (72.68)
2009    1st      Francophone Games                    (71.30)
2009    2nd      Arab Championships                    (74.31)
2010     1st    African Championships                (74.72)

Prepared by Carole Fuchs for the IAAF ‘Focus on Athletes’ project. Copyright IAAF 2010

Personal Best - Outdoor
Performance Wind Place Date
Hammer Throw 77.36 Al-Qâhirah 29 MAR 2010
Hammer Throw (6kg) 79.56 Al-Qâhirah 28 DEC 2004
Hammer Throw (5kg) 74.43 01 JUN 2001
Personal Best - Indoor
Performance Wind Place Date
35libs Weight 22.95 Blacksburg, VA 24 FEB 2006
Progression - Outdoor showShow All Graphs
Hammer Throw Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2014 73.31 Radès 27 APR
2013 71.92 Doha 22 MAY
2012 75.97 Al-Qâhirah 15 JUN
2011 72.06 Radés 26 JUN
2010 77.36 Al-Qâhirah 29 MAR
2009 76.40 Al-Qâhirah 08 MAY
2008 75.20 Al-Qâhirah 29 FEB
2007 76.00 Al-Qâhirah 08 OCT
2006 70.55 Winston-Salem, NC 20 APR
2005 75.31 Al-Qâhirah 22 JUL
2004 72.50 Al-Qâhirah 24 AUG
2003 68.79 Al-Qâhirah 18 SEP
2002 63.13 Al-Qâhirah 18 APR
Hammer Throw (6kg) Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2004 79.56 Al-Qâhirah 28 DEC
2003 75.71 Al-Qâhirah 22 AUG
Hammer Throw (5kg) Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2001 74.43 01 JUN
Progression - Indoor showShow All Graphs
35libs Weight Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2006 22.58 Clemson, SC 03 DEC
2006 22.95 Blacksburg, VA 24 FEB
Honours - Hammer Throw
Rank Mark Wind Place Date
1st IAAF/VTB Bank Continental Cup 2010 8 69.77 Split (Poljud Stadium) 04 SEP 2010
12th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 10q1 72.68 Berlin (Olympiastadion) 15 AUG 2009
The XXIX Olympic Games q1 NM Beijing (National Stadium) 15 AUG 2008
11th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 10q1 72.93 Osaka (Nagai Stadium) 25 AUG 2007
10th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 12q2 71.78 Helsinki 06 AUG 2005
Honours - Hammer Throw (6kg)
Rank Mark Wind Place Date
10th IAAF World Junior Championships 2 72.98 Grosseto 16 JUL 2004
IAAF/Coca Cola World Junior Championships q1 NM Kingston, JAM 16 JUL 2002
Honours - Hammer Throw (5kg)
Rank Mark Wind Place Date
2nd IAAF/Westel World Youth Championships 10q2 65.38 Debrecen 14 JUL 2001


Focus on Athletes biographies are produced by the IAAF Communications Dept, and not by the IAAF Statistics and Documentation Division. If you have any enquiries concerning the information, please use the Contact IAAF page, selecting ‘Focus on Athletes Biographies’ in the drop down menu of contact area options.


Created August 16 2010

Mohsen ANANI, Egypt (Hammer Throw)

Born 21 May 1985, Tunis
1.87m / 117kg
Coach: Nagy Assad
Mother Tunisian, father Egyptian. Brother Sadok, born in 1982 is a javelin thrower (71.50m PB in 2009)

Egypt’s Mohsen Anani is asserting himself as the leader of hammer throw in Africa, ending a decade-long domination by South Africa’s Chris Harmse.

The son of an Egyptian father and a Tunisian mother, Mohsen was born in Tunis, where he spent his early life. His mother, a former long jumper, encouraged her 2 sons to try athletics, but Mohsen wasn’t interested. Things changed when he saw his brother Sadok starting to win Tunisia’s youth titles and he decided to give it a try too. Following in his brother’s footsteps, Mohsen started with the javelin, but it became rapidly clear he had no potential in the event.

In December 1998, the family moved back to Egypt. Mohsen switched to the shot put but didn’t experience good feelings with that event either. His brother then told him “Why don’t you try the hammer?” and a career was launched. “From the first day, I knew, this is my event,” Mohsen remembers.

Things then went quite fast for the younger Anani who broke the Egyptian youth record after only three months of training and earned his first selection in the national team.  After the 1999 national youth championships he was recruited by former African shot put champion Nagy Assad, who was by then setting up a throwing school in Egypt that also included discus thrower Omar el Ghazaly and shot putter Yasser Fathy. The young Mohsen was very proud to be part of it.

The first regional medals came quickly. In 2000, Anani placed 3rd at the Pan Arab Junior Championships in Damascus (51.41m) and in 2001 he was 2nd at the African Junior Championships in Mauritius (57.11m), with the senior implement in both cases. But his first outings on the world scene turned out to be frustrating experiences. The young thrower was among the top 6 entrants at the 2001 World Youth Championships in Debrecen, but couldn’t do better than 65.38m, finishing 19th and failing to advance to the final – a big disappointment. 

The following year he threw 71.40m, with the 6kg implement in April in Cairo but recorded 3 fouls at the World Juniors in Kingston. His coach tried to comfort him explaining he was still young and would still have the opportunity to compete another time at the World Juniors, as he was only 17. He then took 2nd place at the Arab Junior Championships in Cairo in September (70.04m – 6kg) behind Kuwait’s Ali Al-Zankawi, who is still dominating the event on the Arab scene at the moment.

In 2003, Anani became African junior champion in Garoua, Cameroon (68.41m - 6kg) and improved his best with the 6kg to 75.71m. Alongside his junior career he also started to draw attention to himself in the senior ranks. Early September, he placed 4th at the Arab Championships (68.30m). He then defeated the national champion for the first time, claiming his first national title (68.79m), which earned him a selection for the All Africa Games in Abuja, Nigeria, in October, where he placed 5th (67.24m)

2004 was a major year for Anani’s career, with a second participation at the World Junior Championships. He came to Grosseto with a 77.23m best, and this time the young Egyptian lived up to his promises, claiming a silver medal thanks to a 72.98m effort. Early August he went above 70m with the senior implement for the first time (70.41m on 5 August in Cairo) and set a new African junior record with the senior implement (72.50m) on 22 August in Cairo. In October, he clinched a silver medal at the Pan Arab Games in Algiers (71.65m). The season wasn’t over yet, as Anani cherished another dream: in his last two months as a junior, he wanted to take a shot at the World junior record that stood at 81.34m. From 22 November to 28 December, he competed at home with the 6kg hammer no fewer than 8 times, coming short of his goal, but eventually improving his national record to 79.56m.

In 2005, for his first year as a senior Anani, managed to qualify for the Helsinki World Championships, setting a national record and a B-qualifier (75.31m) on 22 July, three days before the entry deadline. There, he finished 23rd of the qualifications with 71.78m.  He then moved to the United States, where he was enrolled as a student at Virginia Tech. The programme was supposed to last 4 years, but the Egyptian cut the experience short after a year, because the different training methods did not work out for him. He finished 4th of the NCAA Championships and brought precious points to the team but his performances had dropped from 75m to 68m, a situation that was far from satisfying for an athlete who had much higher ambitions. In summer 2006, he thus came back to Egypt and the Cairo Higher Institute where he graduated in business in 2009. He then placed 3rd at the African Championships in Mauritius (69.22m) before ending his season with 72.00m at the end of August in Cairo.

In 2007, the Egyptian progressively worked his way back to his previous level, recording a performance of 74.57m early July in Cairo. He then travelled to Algiers for the All Africa Games (2nd with 72.00m) and to Bangkok for the World University Games (4th with 72.66), before the World championships in Osaka where he placed 19th in the qualifications (72.93m).  The season was not over, however, with the Pan Arab Games at home at the end of November. Preparing for the event, Anani set a new national record of 76.00m on 8 October. He went on to claim the Arab title in a rare defeat of Kuwait’s Al-Zankawi (74.22m to 74.02m).

2008 started with a good opening (75.20m at the end of February). There were another couple of 73m throws but then the performances dropped around 70 meters. At the Beijing Olympics, Anani suffered from blood pressure problems and had 3 fouls, unable to record a valid throw. 

The following year again started with good performances on home soil (a series of 74.82, 75.97, 75.48, 76.40 in Cairo from March to May, 76.40m being a new national record and the best performance in Africa that season), but there were more difficulties to reach a similar level, during the summer, abroad. There was a 5th place at the Mediterranean Games in Pescara (71.58), a 10th place at the World University Games in Beograd (69.91) and a 20th place at the World Championships in Berlin (72.68). The year however ended on a better note in October with a victory at the Francophone Games in Beirut (71.30m) and a silver medal at the Arab Championships in Damascus (74.31m).

2010 marked a breakthrough as his new national record of 77.36m, set on 29 March, propelled him for the first time in the world Top 20 of the year (at the end of August, Anani is ranked 19th). The Egyptian also clinched his first continental crown (74.72m at the African Championships in Nairobi), ending a decade-long domination by South African veteran Chris Harmse and earning his first selection to represent Africa at the Continental Cup.

Anani is now hoping to get more opportunities to compete abroad and to take part to the Hammer Throw World Challenge next year and is very confident he can make the final at the 2011 World Championships in Daegu.

Unlike many athletes, Mohsen Anani rarely leaves his training base in Cairo.  “I don’t like training camps. Training camps are not working for me,” says the Egyptian, who points out that his country offers very good weather conditions throughout the year.

When he is not training, Anani enjoys spending time drawing, hanging out with friends and watching movies, especially horror movies.

Personal Best
77.36 (2010)

Yearly Progression
2000: 51.41; 2001: 58.65; 2002: 63.11 / 71.40 (6kg); 2003: 68.79 / 75.71 (6kg); 2004: 72.50 AJR / 79.56 (6kg); 2005: 75.31 NR; 2006: 72.00; 2007: 76.00 NR; 2008: 75.20; 2009: 76.40 NR; 2010: 77.36 NR

Career Highlights
2000    3rd      Arab Junior Championships                (51.41)
2001    2nd     African Junior Championships            (57.11)
2001    q    World Youth Championships                (65.38 - 5kg)
2002    q    World Junior Championships                (NM)
2002    2nd     Arab Junior Championships                (70.04 - 6kg)
2003    1st     African Junior Championships            (68. 41 - 6kg)
2003    4th      Arab Championships                    (68.30)
2003    5th    All Africa Games                    (67.24)
2004   2nd    World Junior Championships                (72.98 - 6kg)
2004    2nd     Pan Arab Games                     (71.65)
2005    4th      Arab Solidarity Games                 (69.50)
2005    8th     Mediterranean Games                (69.83)
2005    q     World Championships                 (71.78)
2006    4th     NCAA Championships                (68.35)
2006    3rd    African Championships                (69.22)
2007    2nd    All Africa Games                     (72.00)
2007    4th    World University Games                (72.66)
2007    q    World Championships                    (72.93)
2007    1st    Pan Arab Games                    (74.22)
2008    q    Olympic Games                     (NM)
2009    5th    Mediterranean Games                 (71.58)
2009    10th     World University Games                (69.91)
2009    q    World Championships                    (72.68)
2009    1st      Francophone Games                    (71.30)
2009    2nd      Arab Championships                    (74.31)
2010     1st    African Championships                (74.72)

Prepared by Carole Fuchs for the IAAF ‘Focus on Athletes’ project. Copyright IAAF 2010