Veronica Campbell-Brown (Getty Images)
Veronica Campbell-Brown (Getty Images)
  • COUNTRY Jamaica Jamaica
  • DATE OF BIRTH 15 MAY 1982


Focus on Athletes biographies are produced by the IAAF Communications Dept, and not by the IAAF Statistics and Documentation Division. If you have any enquiries concerning the information, please use the Contact IAAF page, selecting ‘Focus on Athletes Biographies’ in the drop down menu of contact area options.


Updated 9 August 2008

Veronica CAMPBELL-BROWN (nee Campbell), Jamaica (100/200/4x100m)

Born 15 May 1982, Trelawny
Lives: Orlando, Florida
1.63 / 61kg
Coach: Lance Brauman
Manager: Claude Bryan

Who would have thought it? Consider the great names from Jamaica - past and present, men and women - who have graced the 100m. Herb McKenley, Lennox Miller, Don Quarrie, Merlene Ottey, Asafa Powell, Usain Bolt. But none has won a senior global gold medal in the blue riband event of athletics. That historic first moment belongs to Veronica Campbell after her triumph at the 2007 World Championships, in Osaka.

But the recently-married (November 2007) Veronica Campbell-Brown is accustomed to making history. Winner of the first World Youth Championships 100m in 1999, she was also the first to achieve the women’s sprint double at the World Junior Championships, in 2000,  and is the first Jamaican woman to hold an Olympic sprint title, having taken the 200m gold at Athens 2004.

The day after Powell had disappointed his homeland by finishing third, behind Tyson Gay (United States) and Derrick Atkins (Bahamas) in the men’s 100m Final in Osaka, Campbell raised the Jamaican flag in the closest of finishes After a long delay for the result to be confirmed – both Campbell and defending champion Lauryn Williams (US) timed 11.01 – she was able to celebrate her latest entry into the national record books.

Until Campbell ended the 111-year wait, since the first modern Olympics in 1896, for a Jamaican Olympic or World 100m champion, the list of near misses was long indeed: 1952 Olympics: McKenley - runner-up to Lindy Remigino (US); 1968 Olympics: Miller - runner-up to Jim Hines (US); 1976 Olympics: Quarrie - runner-up to Hasely Crawford (Trinidad); 1987 World Championships - Ray Stewart runner-up to Carl Lewis (US); 1992 Olympics: Juliet Cuthbert - runner-up to Gail Devers (US); 1993 World Championships: Ottey - runner-up to Devers; 1995 World Championships: Ottey - runner-up to Gwen Torrence (US). 1996 Olympics: Ottey - runner-up to Devers; And, in the 2005 World Championships, in Helsinki, even Campbell herself finished runner-up, to Williams.

Adding to Jamaica’s catalogue of near misses, at the 2000 Olympics Tanya Lawrence finished third behind Marion Jones (US) and Katerina Thanou (Greece). The American and Greek have since been discredited for doping offences. At the 2005 World Championships, Michael Frater finished second to Justin Gatlin, another American who was later banned.

All of which left Campbell to make the big breakthrough. Her road to history began in Trelawny, the parish which has produced many prominent Jamaican athletes, among them Merlene Frazer, Ben Johnson, Michael Green and Bolt. More specifically, it began along the track between the family home and local grocery store. Mum, having identified her daughter’s speed, put it to practical use, setting young Veronica as the automatic timer for dinner.

“I was always the favourite child to be sent to the grocery store to buy groceries because I would do it so quickly,” Campbell recalled. “It was a dirt path and I would run there and back. It wasn’t very far and, if my mum sent me to get some eggs for breakfast, she could put the fat on the fire and know I would be back in time before it burned out. So I have been running from a very tender age.”

Whether it was fetching the eggs or shattering the egos of local boys who thought they could outrun her, Campbell never doubted her ability. “The boys always thought they could beat me, so we would always compete to prove a point, and I always won,” she recalled. “I was around 9 or 10, the boys were maybe 15. There was one particular guy who was an athlete and he always thought he was the fastest but I would always beat him.”

How long did it take him to get the message? “I guess he didn’t get it because he didn’t beat me once and kept coming back,” Campbell said. “I haven’t seen him for many years, so I don’t know where he is.”

Like Gay, the World 100 and 200m champion, Campbell was in Osaka while their coach, Lance Brauman, was in prison on fraud charges. According to Campbell, Brauman continued to set her sessions, coaching by telephone. At the World Championships, Omar Brown, the Commonwealth 200m champion and her fiancé at the time  would oversee her workouts. Now Campbell trains under Brauman in Orlando, Florida. Of her relationship with her coach, Campbell said: “I have been working with him for a long time, since my junior college days, so it is a long relationship. He is a great coach and we get along well. His workouts really work for me.”

Campbell is grateful for the inspirational role played by Ottey in her career. “Merlene is a wonderful person, she has always been my hero,” Campbell said. “We communicate on a regular basis. She has always given me good encouragement. I learned about Merlene Ottey when I went to Vere Technical High School. She was a student there and everybody at Vere spoke highly of her.

“My first memory of athletics on TV was the Atlanta Olympics. The women’s 100m was very exciting – Merlene and Gail Devers and that photo-finish was one of the most memorable things of the Olympics.” That photo-finish, to which Campbell refers, resulted in Devers, from the US, taking gold in 10.94, the same time as Ottey, who had to settle for silver.

Campbell has four sisters and five brothers, although she was raised in a split family. “I didn’t grow up with all my brothers and sisters, I was brought up with mum and stepdad,” she said. “It was a small house. My father used to do sports and I have two bigger brothers who used to run track in high school but, apart from them, I am the only one who is an athlete in my family.”

It was from Vere that Campbell went to Barton County College in Kansas, where she met Brauman. Then she went to the University of Arkansas from where she graduated in 2006. Why Arskansas? “When I was trying to decide which university I would go to after leaving junior college I went on a few visits and I was fascinated by the business programme at Arkansas,” she said. “That was one of my reasons for going there then Omar wanted to go there and there were other Jamaicans there. I wanted to go somewhere where I would feel at home away from home.”

Campbell has won four Olympic and five World Championships medals. They include not only her 100m triumph in Osaka but the 200m title at the Athens Olympics She will defend this title in Beijing  but, after finishing fourth in the Jamaican trials, she was named only as reserve for the 100m. Naturally, she is also included in the 4x100m squad. 

Brown and Campbell were married in Montego Bay. Guests included Gay, Ottey and Prime Minister Bruce Golding. The newlyweds share a number of interests away from the track. They play each other at golf and bowling.  When it comes to spending her winnings, Campbell says that her only real indulgence is her collection of Louis Vuitton handbags.

Campbell added: “I have not fully maximised my potential in this sport so I am just working hard and looking forward to the future. Hopefully, I can create some more history before the end of my career. I just want to be the best I can be, whatever that is.”


Personal Bests

100m: 10.85 (2005)
200m: 21.94 (2008)

Yearly Progression

100m: 1999: 11.49; 2000: 11.12; 2001: 11.13; 2002; 11.00; 2003: -; 2004: 10.91; 2005: 10.85; 2006: 10.99; 2007: 10.89; 2008: 10.87.

200m: 1999: 23.73; 2000: 22.87; 2001: 22.92; 2002: 22.39; 2003: -; 2004: 22.05; 2005: 22.35/22.29w; 2006: 22.51; 2007: 22.34; 2008: 21.94.


Career Highlights

1999 1st World Youth Championships (100m)
2000 1st World Junior Championships (100/200m)
2000 2nd World Junior Championships (4x100m)
2000 2nd Olympic Games (4x100m)
2002 2nd, Commonwealth Games (100m/4x100m)
2004 1st Olympic Games (200/4x100m)
2004 3rd Olympic Games (100m)
2004 1st World Athletics Final (100m/200m)
2005 2nd World Championships (100/4x100m)
2005 4th World Championships (200m)
2005 1st World Athletics Final (100m)
2005 2nd World Athletics Final (200m)
2006 2nd Commonwealth Games (200m)
2007 1st World Championships (100m)
2007 2nd World Championships (200/4x100m)


Prepared by David Powell for the IAAF ‘Focus on Athletes’ project. Copyright IAAF 2008.

Personal Best - Outdoor
Performance Wind Place Date
100 Metres 10.76 +1.1 Ostrava 31 MAY 2011
200 Metres 21.74 +0.6 Beijing (National Stadium) 21 AUG 2008
400 Metres 52.25 Orlando, FL 26 MAR 2011
Personal Best - Indoor
Performance Wind Place Date
50 Metres 6.08 New York (MSG), NY 28 JAN 2012
60 Metres 7.00 Doha 14 MAR 2010
200 Metres 22.38 Birmingham, GBR 18 FEB 2005
400 Metres 52.24 Fayetteville, AR 22 JAN 2005
Progression - Outdoor showShow All Graphs
100 Metres Show Graphshow
Performance Wind Place Date
2014 10.86 +2.0 Clermont, FL 07 JUN
2013 11.01 0.0 Kingston (NS), JAM 04 MAY
2012 10.81 +1.5 London (OP) 04 AUG
2011 10.76 +1.1 Ostrava 31 MAY
2010 10.78 +0.8 Eugene, OR 03 JUL
2009 10.89 +1.2 Shanghai 20 SEP
2008 10.87 0.0 London (CP) 26 JUL
2007 10.89 +1.0 Kingston (NS), JAM 23 JUN
2006 10.99 +1.0 Carson, CA 21 MAY
2005 10.85 +0.4 Zürich 19 AUG
2004 10.91 0.0 Monaco 19 SEP
2002 11.00 +1.5 Manchester 27 JUL
2001 11.13 +1.2 Kingston, JAM 06 APR
2000 11.12 +2.0 Santiago de Chile 18 OCT
1999 11.49 +0.6 Bydgoszcz 16 JUL
1998 12.04 -0.7 Annecy 28 JUL
200 Metres Show Graphshow
Performance Wind Place Date
2014 22.94 +1.9 Clermont, FL 10 MAY
2013 22.53 -1.3 New York City, NY 25 MAY
2012 22.32 +1.0 London (OP) 07 AUG
2011 22.22 -1.0 Daegu 02 SEP
2010 21.98 +1.4 New York City, NY 12 JUN
2009 22.29 +0.5 Berlin 20 AUG
2008 21.74 +0.6 Beijing (National Stadium) 21 AUG
2007 22.34 +1.7 Osaka (Nagai Stadium) 31 AUG
2006 22.51 +1.8 Kingston (NS), JAM 06 MAY
2005 22.35 0.0 Torino 03 JUN
2004 22.05 +0.8 Athína (Olympic Stadium) 25 AUG
2002 22.39 +0.4 Odessa, TX 18 MAY
2001 22.92 +0.5 Kingston, JAM 07 APR
2000 22.87 +0.7 Santiago de Chile 21 OCT
400 Metres Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2011 52.25 Orlando, FL 26 MAR
2010 52.77 Knoxville, TN 09 APR
Progression - Indoor showShow All Graphs
50 Metres Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2012 6.08 New York (MSG), NY 28 JAN
60 Metres Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2014 7.13 Sopot (Ergo Arena) 09 MAR
2012 7.01 Istanbul (Ataköy Arena) 11 MAR
2011 7.11 New York (MSG), NY 28 JAN
2010 7.00 Doha 14 MAR
2006 7.04 Fayetteville, AR 10 FEB
2005 7.09 Fayetteville, AR 11 FEB
2004 7.20 Lexington, KY 29 FEB
2003 7.09 Norman, OK 01 FEB
2002 7.17 Lincoln, NE 02 FEB
200 Metres Show Graphshow
Performance Wind Place Date
2006 22.84 Birmingham 18 FEB
2005 22.38 Birmingham, GBR 18 FEB
2004 22.43 Fayetteville, AR 12 MAR
2003 22.63 Fayetteville, AR 14 FEB
2002 23.12 Lincoln, NE 02 FEB
400 Metres Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2005 52.24 Fayetteville, AR 22 JAN
Honours - 60 Metres
Rank Mark Wind Place Date
IAAF World Indoor Championships 2014 5 7.13 Sopot (Ergo Arena) 09 MAR 2014
IAAF World Indoor Championships 2012 1 7.01 Istanbul (Ataköy Arena) 11 MAR 2012
13th IAAF World Indoor Championships 1 7.00 Doha 14 MAR 2010
Honours - 100 Metres
Rank Mark Wind Place Date
IAAF Continental Cup 2014 1 11.08 -1.5 Marrakech (Le Grande Stade) 13 SEP 2014
The XXX Olympic Games 3 10.81 +1.5 London (OP) 04 AUG 2012
13th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 2 10.97 -1.4 Daegu 29 AUG 2011
12th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 4 10.95 +0.1 Berlin 17 AUG 2009
11th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 1 11.01 -0.2 Osaka (Nagai Stadium) 27 AUG 2007
3rd IAAF World Athletics Final 1 10.92 -0.2 Monaco 09 SEP 2005
10th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 2 10.95 +1.3 Helsinki 08 AUG 2005
2nd IAAF World Athletics Final 1 10.91 0.0 Monaco 19 SEP 2004
28th Olympic Games 3 10.97 -0.1 Athína (Olympic Stadium) 21 AUG 2004
IAAF/Coca Cola World Junior Championships 1 11.12 +2.0 Santiago de Chile 18 OCT 2000
1st IAAF World Youth Championships 1 11.49 +0.6 Bydgoszcz 16 JUL 1999
IAAF World Junior Championships 6qf3 12.04 -0.7 Annecy 28 JUL 1998
Honours - 200 Metres
Rank Mark Wind Place Date
The XXX Olympic Games 4 22.38 -0.2 London (OP) 08 AUG 2012
13th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 1 22.22 -1.0 Daegu 02 SEP 2011
12th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 2 22.35 -0.1 Berlin 21 AUG 2009
The XXIX Olympic Games 1 21.74 +0.6 Beijing (National Stadium) 21 AUG 2008
11th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 2 22.34 +1.7 Osaka (Nagai Stadium) 31 AUG 2007
3rd IAAF World Athletics Final 2 22.37 -0.6 Monaco 10 SEP 2005
10th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 4 22.38 +0.2 Helsinki 12 AUG 2005
2nd IAAF World Athletics Final 1 22.64 -2.2 Monaco 18 SEP 2004
28th Olympic Games 1 22.05 +0.8 Athína (Olympic Stadium) 25 AUG 2004
IAAF/Coca Cola World Junior Championships 1 22.87 +0.7 Santiago de Chile 21 OCT 2000


Focus on Athletes biographies are produced by the IAAF Communications Dept, and not by the IAAF Statistics and Documentation Division. If you have any enquiries concerning the information, please use the Contact IAAF page, selecting ‘Focus on Athletes Biographies’ in the drop down menu of contact area options.


Updated 9 August 2008

Veronica CAMPBELL-BROWN (nee Campbell), Jamaica (100/200/4x100m)

Born 15 May 1982, Trelawny
Lives: Orlando, Florida
1.63 / 61kg
Coach: Lance Brauman
Manager: Claude Bryan

Who would have thought it? Consider the great names from Jamaica - past and present, men and women - who have graced the 100m. Herb McKenley, Lennox Miller, Don Quarrie, Merlene Ottey, Asafa Powell, Usain Bolt. But none has won a senior global gold medal in the blue riband event of athletics. That historic first moment belongs to Veronica Campbell after her triumph at the 2007 World Championships, in Osaka.

But the recently-married (November 2007) Veronica Campbell-Brown is accustomed to making history. Winner of the first World Youth Championships 100m in 1999, she was also the first to achieve the women’s sprint double at the World Junior Championships, in 2000,  and is the first Jamaican woman to hold an Olympic sprint title, having taken the 200m gold at Athens 2004.

The day after Powell had disappointed his homeland by finishing third, behind Tyson Gay (United States) and Derrick Atkins (Bahamas) in the men’s 100m Final in Osaka, Campbell raised the Jamaican flag in the closest of finishes After a long delay for the result to be confirmed – both Campbell and defending champion Lauryn Williams (US) timed 11.01 – she was able to celebrate her latest entry into the national record books.

Until Campbell ended the 111-year wait, since the first modern Olympics in 1896, for a Jamaican Olympic or World 100m champion, the list of near misses was long indeed: 1952 Olympics: McKenley - runner-up to Lindy Remigino (US); 1968 Olympics: Miller - runner-up to Jim Hines (US); 1976 Olympics: Quarrie - runner-up to Hasely Crawford (Trinidad); 1987 World Championships - Ray Stewart runner-up to Carl Lewis (US); 1992 Olympics: Juliet Cuthbert - runner-up to Gail Devers (US); 1993 World Championships: Ottey - runner-up to Devers; 1995 World Championships: Ottey - runner-up to Gwen Torrence (US). 1996 Olympics: Ottey - runner-up to Devers; And, in the 2005 World Championships, in Helsinki, even Campbell herself finished runner-up, to Williams.

Adding to Jamaica’s catalogue of near misses, at the 2000 Olympics Tanya Lawrence finished third behind Marion Jones (US) and Katerina Thanou (Greece). The American and Greek have since been discredited for doping offences. At the 2005 World Championships, Michael Frater finished second to Justin Gatlin, another American who was later banned.

All of which left Campbell to make the big breakthrough. Her road to history began in Trelawny, the parish which has produced many prominent Jamaican athletes, among them Merlene Frazer, Ben Johnson, Michael Green and Bolt. More specifically, it began along the track between the family home and local grocery store. Mum, having identified her daughter’s speed, put it to practical use, setting young Veronica as the automatic timer for dinner.

“I was always the favourite child to be sent to the grocery store to buy groceries because I would do it so quickly,” Campbell recalled. “It was a dirt path and I would run there and back. It wasn’t very far and, if my mum sent me to get some eggs for breakfast, she could put the fat on the fire and know I would be back in time before it burned out. So I have been running from a very tender age.”

Whether it was fetching the eggs or shattering the egos of local boys who thought they could outrun her, Campbell never doubted her ability. “The boys always thought they could beat me, so we would always compete to prove a point, and I always won,” she recalled. “I was around 9 or 10, the boys were maybe 15. There was one particular guy who was an athlete and he always thought he was the fastest but I would always beat him.”

How long did it take him to get the message? “I guess he didn’t get it because he didn’t beat me once and kept coming back,” Campbell said. “I haven’t seen him for many years, so I don’t know where he is.”

Like Gay, the World 100 and 200m champion, Campbell was in Osaka while their coach, Lance Brauman, was in prison on fraud charges. According to Campbell, Brauman continued to set her sessions, coaching by telephone. At the World Championships, Omar Brown, the Commonwealth 200m champion and her fiancé at the time  would oversee her workouts. Now Campbell trains under Brauman in Orlando, Florida. Of her relationship with her coach, Campbell said: “I have been working with him for a long time, since my junior college days, so it is a long relationship. He is a great coach and we get along well. His workouts really work for me.”

Campbell is grateful for the inspirational role played by Ottey in her career. “Merlene is a wonderful person, she has always been my hero,” Campbell said. “We communicate on a regular basis. She has always given me good encouragement. I learned about Merlene Ottey when I went to Vere Technical High School. She was a student there and everybody at Vere spoke highly of her.

“My first memory of athletics on TV was the Atlanta Olympics. The women’s 100m was very exciting – Merlene and Gail Devers and that photo-finish was one of the most memorable things of the Olympics.” That photo-finish, to which Campbell refers, resulted in Devers, from the US, taking gold in 10.94, the same time as Ottey, who had to settle for silver.

Campbell has four sisters and five brothers, although she was raised in a split family. “I didn’t grow up with all my brothers and sisters, I was brought up with mum and stepdad,” she said. “It was a small house. My father used to do sports and I have two bigger brothers who used to run track in high school but, apart from them, I am the only one who is an athlete in my family.”

It was from Vere that Campbell went to Barton County College in Kansas, where she met Brauman. Then she went to the University of Arkansas from where she graduated in 2006. Why Arskansas? “When I was trying to decide which university I would go to after leaving junior college I went on a few visits and I was fascinated by the business programme at Arkansas,” she said. “That was one of my reasons for going there then Omar wanted to go there and there were other Jamaicans there. I wanted to go somewhere where I would feel at home away from home.”

Campbell has won four Olympic and five World Championships medals. They include not only her 100m triumph in Osaka but the 200m title at the Athens Olympics She will defend this title in Beijing  but, after finishing fourth in the Jamaican trials, she was named only as reserve for the 100m. Naturally, she is also included in the 4x100m squad. 

Brown and Campbell were married in Montego Bay. Guests included Gay, Ottey and Prime Minister Bruce Golding. The newlyweds share a number of interests away from the track. They play each other at golf and bowling.  When it comes to spending her winnings, Campbell says that her only real indulgence is her collection of Louis Vuitton handbags.

Campbell added: “I have not fully maximised my potential in this sport so I am just working hard and looking forward to the future. Hopefully, I can create some more history before the end of my career. I just want to be the best I can be, whatever that is.”


Personal Bests

100m: 10.85 (2005)
200m: 21.94 (2008)

Yearly Progression

100m: 1999: 11.49; 2000: 11.12; 2001: 11.13; 2002; 11.00; 2003: -; 2004: 10.91; 2005: 10.85; 2006: 10.99; 2007: 10.89; 2008: 10.87.

200m: 1999: 23.73; 2000: 22.87; 2001: 22.92; 2002: 22.39; 2003: -; 2004: 22.05; 2005: 22.35/22.29w; 2006: 22.51; 2007: 22.34; 2008: 21.94.


Career Highlights

1999 1st World Youth Championships (100m)
2000 1st World Junior Championships (100/200m)
2000 2nd World Junior Championships (4x100m)
2000 2nd Olympic Games (4x100m)
2002 2nd, Commonwealth Games (100m/4x100m)
2004 1st Olympic Games (200/4x100m)
2004 3rd Olympic Games (100m)
2004 1st World Athletics Final (100m/200m)
2005 2nd World Championships (100/4x100m)
2005 4th World Championships (200m)
2005 1st World Athletics Final (100m)
2005 2nd World Athletics Final (200m)
2006 2nd Commonwealth Games (200m)
2007 1st World Championships (100m)
2007 2nd World Championships (200/4x100m)


Prepared by David Powell for the IAAF ‘Focus on Athletes’ project. Copyright IAAF 2008.