Athlete Profile

Danil Burkenya

  • COUNTRY Russia Russia
  • DATE OF BIRTH 20 JUL 1978
Russian triple jumper Danil Burkenya (Getty Images)
Russian triple jumper Danil Burkenya (Getty Images)
  • COUNTRY Russia Russia
  • DATE OF BIRTH 20 JUL 1978


Focus on Athletes biographies are produced by the IAAF Communications Dept, and not by the IAAF Statistics and Documentation Division. If you have any enquiries concerning the information, please use the Contact IAAF page, selecting ‘Focus on Athletes Biographies’ in the drop down menu of contact area options.


Updated 25 February 2008

Danil BURKENYA, Russia (Triple Jump)

Born: 20 July 1978, Ashgabat (Turkmenistan)

Height: 1,98m/Weight: 85kg

Lives: Moscow

Coach: Yevgeny Ter-Avanesov

Bored with basketball, having played since he was eight, Danil Burkenya switched to athletics in 1992, when he was 14, and it was not long before he made progress in high jumping.

Coached by Yevgeny Ter-Avanesov, and living in Ashgabat, the capital of Turkmenistan, a former USSR republic, Burkenya’s life changed with his family moved to Moscow in 1995. He entered the State Academy of Oil and Gas, playing basketball in the academy team and taking part in track and field competitions. When Ter-Avanesov also moved to Moscow, Burkenya recommenced his training with pleasure. He started to train for the high jump, long jump and triple jump, but his main discipline was the long jump.

“The long jump is much harder for me, because my back always hurts, but after triple jump I don’t feel any pain or discomfort,” Burkenya said. In spite of this, he became the champion of Russia three years running (2000-2002) in long jump. In 2001, he won with a personal best 8.31m.

However, in world competitions Burkenya always fell short. He suffered poor results at the 2000 Olympic Games, in Sydney, and at the 2001 and 2003 World Championships in Edmonton and Paris, failing to qualify for the final on each occasion.

“I kept thinking about reasons of my failures,” Burkenya said. “My mind was in chaos. I couldn’t conceive how I should behave during competitions. And then I decided to consult a psychologist. He sorted out my state of mind, though he didn’t say anything new for me. But, with his help, I gradually started to replace words ‘I cannot do it, it’s impossible’ with ‘I will try to do it’. During competitions I would try not to think about my rivals because it could hinder me. I concentrated just upon my technique of jumping.” 

After a series of unsuccessful performances in long jump, Burkenya’s trainer suggested that he turn his attention only to triple jump. All of the winter season of 2004 was dedicated to the triple jump, preparing seriously for the Athens Olympics that summer.

Burkenya would compete less often, to have time for recovery, and this enabled him to produce stable results at about 17.30m. At the Russian Championships, he set his personal best of 17.68m, which instilled confidence on the eve of the Olympics.

”But I have to confess that, during the qualifying round, I felt terrible nervousness and I managed to jump the qualification standard only at the last attempt – 17.08m,” he said. “And in final everything went more serious. My first three attempts were not good enough, but luckily I got through and my last three trials were almost equal - 17.45, 17.48 and 17.47. Thanks to this I gained the bronze medal at the Olympic Games.”

For the time being 2004 remains the best year in his sporting career. But a new Olympic season has come. So Burkenya and his trainer concentrate all their efforts on the main goal – to get to Beijing and perform successfully there.

Already in 2008 Burkenya has won the Russian Indoor Championships (16.93m) but he remained dissatisfied with his result:  “At the beginning I was jumping well, I was landing further and further,” he said. “But then I started to invent something by changing my jumping techniques. I definitely shouldn’t do that. I will try to do my best and to jump over 17m before the World Indoor Championships”.
     

Personal Bests

Long Jump –    8.31 (2001)
Triple Jump – 17.68 (2004)
Indoors
Long Jump –    8.07 (1999)
Triple Jump – 17.41 (2004)


Yearly Progression

Triple Jump: 1995 - 14.75; 1996 - 15.09; 1997 - 16.29; 1998 - 16.36; 1999 - 16.30i/; 2000 - 16.14; 2003 - 16.58i/; 2004 - 17.68; 2005 - 17.10; 2006 - 17.42; 2007 - 17.48; 2008 - 16.93i


Career Highlights

1997 4 Russian Indoor U20 Championships Long Jump   7.40
 1 Russian Indoor U20 Championships Triple Jump 15.81
 6 Russian U23 Championships Triple Jump 15.89
 2 Russian U20 Championships Long Jump   7.63
 2 Russian U20 Championships Triple Jump 16.29
 5 European U20 Championships Long Jump   7.62
 9 European U20 Championships Triple Jump 15.70
1998 9 Russian Championships Triple Jump 16.31
1999 2 Russian U23 Championships Long Jump   8.00
 7 European U23 Championships Long Jump   7.81
2000 3 Russian Indoor Championships High Jump   7.80
 3 Russian Indoor Championships Long Jump   7.80
 1 Russian Championships Long Jump   8.12
2001 4 Russian Indoor Championships Long Jump   8.05
 4 Russian Indoor Championships Long Jump   8.05
 1 European Cup Long Jump   7.89
 1 Russian Championships Long Jump   8.31
2002 3 Russian Indoor Championships High Jump   7.90
 3 Russian Indoor Championships Long Jump   7.90
 4 European Cup Long Jump   7.94
 1 Russian Championships Long Jump   8.19
 5 European Championships Long Jump   7.90
2003 2 Russian Championships Long Jump   8.23
2004 3 Russian Indoor Championships Triple Jump 17.03
 7 World Indoor Championships Triple Jump 16.62
 2 European Cup Triple Jump 17.28
 1 Russian Championships Triple Jump 17.68
 3 Olympic Games Triple Jump 17.48
 2 World Athletics Final Triple Jump 17.20
2005 2 European Cup Triple Jump 17.06
 3 Russian Championships Triple Jump 17.08
 4 World Athletics Final Triple Jump 17.10
2006 3 Russian Indoor Championships Triple Jump 17.08
 1 Russian Championships Triple Jump 17.42
 6 European Championships Triple Jump 16.98
 5 World Cup Triple Jump 16.84
2007 2 Russian Championships Triple Jump 16.93
2008 1 Russian Indoor Championships Triple Jump 16.93

 

Prepared by Larisa Voloshina, Sergey Tikhonov & Marina Voloshina for the ‘Focus on Athletes’ project. Copyright IAAF 2008

Personal Best - Outdoor
Performance Wind Place Date
Long Jump 8.31 +0.8 Tula, RUS 14 JUL 2001
Triple Jump 17.68 +0.4 Tula, RUS 31 JUL 2004
Personal Best - Indoor
Performance Wind Place Date
Long Jump 8.07 Moskva 15 JAN 1999
Triple Jump 17.41 Samara 29 JAN 2004
Progression - Outdoor showShow All Graphs
Long Jump Show Graphshow
Performance Wind Place Date
2003 8.23 +0.4 Tula, RUS 10 AUG
2002 8.19 +0.7 Cheboksary 14 JUL
2001 8.31 +0.8 Tula, RUS 14 JUL
2000 8.12 +1.9 Tula, RUS 25 JUL
1999 8.00 Cheboksary 03 JUL
Triple Jump Show Graphshow
Performance Wind Place Date
2008 17.48 +2.0 Kazan 20 JUL
2007 17.48 +1.5 Warszawa 17 JUN
2006 17.42 -0.7 Tula, RUS 15 JUN
2005 17.10 0.0 Monaco (Stade Louis II) 09 SEP
2004 17.68 +0.4 Tula, RUS 31 JUL
Progression - Indoor showShow All Graphs
Long Jump Show Graphshow
Performance Wind Place Date
2003 7.65 Moskva 26 FEB
2002 7.90 Volgograd 13 FEB
2001 8.05 Moskva 18 FEB
2000 7.83 Moskva 27 JAN
1999 8.07 Moskva 15 JAN
Triple Jump Show Graphshow
Performance Wind Place Date
2008 16.93 Moskva 09 FEB
2006 17.13 Moskva 25 JAN
2005 17.01 Moskva 23 JAN
2004 17.41 Samara 29 JAN
2003 16.19 Moskva 16 FEB
1999 16.30 Moskva 23 JAN
1997 15.81 Lipetsk 03 MAR
Honours - Long Jump
Rank Mark Wind Place Date
9th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 16q1 7.52 +0.5 Paris Saint-Denis (Stade de France) 27 AUG 2003
8th IAAF World Championships 9q1 7.63 -0.2 Edmonton 09 AUG 2001
27th Olympic Games 13q1 7.79 +1.2 Sydney 25 SEP 2000
Honours - Triple Jump
Rank Mark Wind Place Date
The XXIX Olympic Games 10q2 16.69 +1.0 Beijing (National Stadium) 18 AUG 2008
12th IAAF World Indoor Championships 8 16.84 Valencia (Velodromo Luís Puig), ESP 09 MAR 2008
11th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 12q2 16.47 -0.2 Osaka (Nagai Stadium) 25 AUG 2007
10th IAAF World Cup 5 16.84 -0.1 Athína (Olympic Stadium) 17 SEP 2006
3rd IAAF World Athletics Final 4 17.10 0.0 Monaco (Stade Louis II) 09 SEP 2005
10th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 11q1 16.35 +0.8 Helsinki 10 AUG 2005
2nd IAAF World Athletics Final 2 17.20 +0.3 Monaco 18 SEP 2004
28th Olympic Games 3 17.48 +0.4 Athína (Olympic Stadium) 22 AUG 2004
10th IAAF World Indoor Championships 7 16.62 Budapest (Sport Arena) 07 MAR 2004


Focus on Athletes biographies are produced by the IAAF Communications Dept, and not by the IAAF Statistics and Documentation Division. If you have any enquiries concerning the information, please use the Contact IAAF page, selecting ‘Focus on Athletes Biographies’ in the drop down menu of contact area options.


Updated 25 February 2008

Danil BURKENYA, Russia (Triple Jump)

Born: 20 July 1978, Ashgabat (Turkmenistan)

Height: 1,98m/Weight: 85kg

Lives: Moscow

Coach: Yevgeny Ter-Avanesov

Bored with basketball, having played since he was eight, Danil Burkenya switched to athletics in 1992, when he was 14, and it was not long before he made progress in high jumping.

Coached by Yevgeny Ter-Avanesov, and living in Ashgabat, the capital of Turkmenistan, a former USSR republic, Burkenya’s life changed with his family moved to Moscow in 1995. He entered the State Academy of Oil and Gas, playing basketball in the academy team and taking part in track and field competitions. When Ter-Avanesov also moved to Moscow, Burkenya recommenced his training with pleasure. He started to train for the high jump, long jump and triple jump, but his main discipline was the long jump.

“The long jump is much harder for me, because my back always hurts, but after triple jump I don’t feel any pain or discomfort,” Burkenya said. In spite of this, he became the champion of Russia three years running (2000-2002) in long jump. In 2001, he won with a personal best 8.31m.

However, in world competitions Burkenya always fell short. He suffered poor results at the 2000 Olympic Games, in Sydney, and at the 2001 and 2003 World Championships in Edmonton and Paris, failing to qualify for the final on each occasion.

“I kept thinking about reasons of my failures,” Burkenya said. “My mind was in chaos. I couldn’t conceive how I should behave during competitions. And then I decided to consult a psychologist. He sorted out my state of mind, though he didn’t say anything new for me. But, with his help, I gradually started to replace words ‘I cannot do it, it’s impossible’ with ‘I will try to do it’. During competitions I would try not to think about my rivals because it could hinder me. I concentrated just upon my technique of jumping.” 

After a series of unsuccessful performances in long jump, Burkenya’s trainer suggested that he turn his attention only to triple jump. All of the winter season of 2004 was dedicated to the triple jump, preparing seriously for the Athens Olympics that summer.

Burkenya would compete less often, to have time for recovery, and this enabled him to produce stable results at about 17.30m. At the Russian Championships, he set his personal best of 17.68m, which instilled confidence on the eve of the Olympics.

”But I have to confess that, during the qualifying round, I felt terrible nervousness and I managed to jump the qualification standard only at the last attempt – 17.08m,” he said. “And in final everything went more serious. My first three attempts were not good enough, but luckily I got through and my last three trials were almost equal - 17.45, 17.48 and 17.47. Thanks to this I gained the bronze medal at the Olympic Games.”

For the time being 2004 remains the best year in his sporting career. But a new Olympic season has come. So Burkenya and his trainer concentrate all their efforts on the main goal – to get to Beijing and perform successfully there.

Already in 2008 Burkenya has won the Russian Indoor Championships (16.93m) but he remained dissatisfied with his result:  “At the beginning I was jumping well, I was landing further and further,” he said. “But then I started to invent something by changing my jumping techniques. I definitely shouldn’t do that. I will try to do my best and to jump over 17m before the World Indoor Championships”.
     

Personal Bests

Long Jump –    8.31 (2001)
Triple Jump – 17.68 (2004)
Indoors
Long Jump –    8.07 (1999)
Triple Jump – 17.41 (2004)


Yearly Progression

Triple Jump: 1995 - 14.75; 1996 - 15.09; 1997 - 16.29; 1998 - 16.36; 1999 - 16.30i/; 2000 - 16.14; 2003 - 16.58i/; 2004 - 17.68; 2005 - 17.10; 2006 - 17.42; 2007 - 17.48; 2008 - 16.93i


Career Highlights

1997 4 Russian Indoor U20 Championships Long Jump   7.40
 1 Russian Indoor U20 Championships Triple Jump 15.81
 6 Russian U23 Championships Triple Jump 15.89
 2 Russian U20 Championships Long Jump   7.63
 2 Russian U20 Championships Triple Jump 16.29
 5 European U20 Championships Long Jump   7.62
 9 European U20 Championships Triple Jump 15.70
1998 9 Russian Championships Triple Jump 16.31
1999 2 Russian U23 Championships Long Jump   8.00
 7 European U23 Championships Long Jump   7.81
2000 3 Russian Indoor Championships High Jump   7.80
 3 Russian Indoor Championships Long Jump   7.80
 1 Russian Championships Long Jump   8.12
2001 4 Russian Indoor Championships Long Jump   8.05
 4 Russian Indoor Championships Long Jump   8.05
 1 European Cup Long Jump   7.89
 1 Russian Championships Long Jump   8.31
2002 3 Russian Indoor Championships High Jump   7.90
 3 Russian Indoor Championships Long Jump   7.90
 4 European Cup Long Jump   7.94
 1 Russian Championships Long Jump   8.19
 5 European Championships Long Jump   7.90
2003 2 Russian Championships Long Jump   8.23
2004 3 Russian Indoor Championships Triple Jump 17.03
 7 World Indoor Championships Triple Jump 16.62
 2 European Cup Triple Jump 17.28
 1 Russian Championships Triple Jump 17.68
 3 Olympic Games Triple Jump 17.48
 2 World Athletics Final Triple Jump 17.20
2005 2 European Cup Triple Jump 17.06
 3 Russian Championships Triple Jump 17.08
 4 World Athletics Final Triple Jump 17.10
2006 3 Russian Indoor Championships Triple Jump 17.08
 1 Russian Championships Triple Jump 17.42
 6 European Championships Triple Jump 16.98
 5 World Cup Triple Jump 16.84
2007 2 Russian Championships Triple Jump 16.93
2008 1 Russian Indoor Championships Triple Jump 16.93

 

Prepared by Larisa Voloshina, Sergey Tikhonov & Marina Voloshina for the ‘Focus on Athletes’ project. Copyright IAAF 2008