Sergey Shubenkov celebrates his 60m Hurdles victory at the European Indoor Championships (Getty Images)
Sergey Shubenkov celebrates his 60m Hurdles victory at the European Indoor Championships (Getty Images)
  • COUNTRY Russia Russia
  • DATE OF BIRTH 4 OCT 1990

Focus on Athletes biographies are produced by the IAAF Communications Dept, and not by the IAAF Statistics and Documentation Division. If you have any enquiries concerning the information, please use the Contact IAAF page, selecting ‘Focus on Athletes Biographies’ in the drop down menu of contact area options.

Updated 28 February 2014

 

Sergey SHUBENKOV, Russia (110 m Hurdles)

Born: 4 October 1990, Barnaul, Siberia

185 cm/ 75 kg

Coach: Sergey Klevtsov

 

"Wonder boy" Shubenkov recently became the first ever Russian male hurdler to medal st the World Championships, after becoming third at the home World Championships. Moreover Shubenkov also beat the Russian record which was two years older than him and became the first European champion in the history of Russian high hurdles. In the country where men sprinters could not even qualify for the Olympics, Shubenkov is the only rising sprint star for ages.

 

"In hurdles the situation in Russia is generally better than in flat sprints,” Shubenkov comments. "In my event people regularly took part at the Olympics and the World Championships, so it was easier for me as I felt part of the tradition.”

 

Shubenkov's amazing progress happened exactly in the Olympic season. In one year, he managed to improve his PB by almost half a second - from 13.46 to 13.09. What is even more amazing for Russian reality, in the previous years Shubenkov's progress was slowed down by his studies.

 

"For four years I studied to be a lawyer in my home town at Barnaul University,” Shubenkov says. "It was not just a formality, I went to the University every day except when I was away at the training camps or competitions. Now that I've got my diploma, I have much more time for trainings. And also, my coach changed several things in my physical and technical preparation. This all together helped me to improve my results.”

 

Shubenkov was born in the city of Barnaul, which is in Siberia. This is the hometown of Olympic medallist long jumper Tatyana Kotova and also Sergey's mother, European 1986 silver medallist in heptathlon Natalya Shubenkova.

 

"When I started athletics, I was running sprints and long jumping,” Shubenkov recalls. "At 14 I jumped about 6 meters, and ran 200m indoors in 22.30. Actually I don't know what would be my 100m result now. I've never run this distance with electronic timing, but I think in good shape I could run in about 10.6.”

 

10.6 would be enough to qualify for the final of the Russian championships, but naturally Shubenkov is not interested. His first success came in 2009 when he became silver medallist at the European Junior Championships in Novi Sad. However, Shubenkov still considers that experience to be the biggest disappointment in his career.

 

 

"I had to win, I came to the Championships as a favourite and was feeling great,” Shubenkov says. "After the first half of the race I was leading. But then I felt like everything was over, I already imagined myself as a champion and relaxed. At this moment the guy from the UK surpassed me and won. After this, I always run till the finish line.”

 

Since 2010 Shubenkov started to compete with seniors. He was 3rd at the Russian Championships, in Saransk, but did not qualify to the European Championships in Barcelona. A year later, Sergey made a step forward. First he won the European U23 Champs in Ostrava, and then qualified to his first senior World Championships in Daegu.

 

“To be honest, I realised that in Daegu I had absolutely no chance to make it to the final,” Shubenkov admitted. “I was more like a tourist in the team. I happened to be in the same heat as the Olympic champion, Liu Xiang. When I went on the track, I saw that the whole stands opposite me were red because of Chinese flags. I was impressed, embarrassed, I was totally confused! I’ve never before experienced such pressure. In the end I ran 0.2 second slower than I actually could.”

 

The next season, 2012, Shubenkov managed to overcome this fear of full stands and big stadiums. In Helsinki Sergey won his first senior title of European champion and in the semi-finals set the new Russian record, 13.09.

 

“It was totally unexpected,” Shubenkov says. “I just wanted to perform my race technically well, and suddenly saw the figures of the national record. I was completely uptight in the finals, and it was extremely hard to pull myself together. But I remembered what happened back in 2009, in Novi Sad, and made myself run 100 per cent. The gold medal was my best prize for that.”

 

Thanks to this gold, Shubenkov got a bye from the national trials in Cheboksary. Instead, Sergey together with his coach Sergey Klevtsov could go to Barnaul and start training for the Olympics. Although the conditions in which Shubenkov trains deserve separate note.

 

“The new track on our stadium was meant for indoors, and so now the track is full of bubbles. We have also another stadium, but there the track is full of hummocks. Maybe it is ok for long distances, but with hurdles I feel them all very well. The indoor stadium has a very old track which has not been renewed for ages.” 

 

“Still, I prefer to train in my home city than away on the training camp,” Shubenkov continues. “It is psychologically very hard to be away from family for such a long time. I think it makes no good when you spend half a year in camps.”

 

Being at home means for Shubenkov not only training and studying. Already for several years he has been taking guitar lessons. “I do not play guitar well, but I like it,” Shubenkov smiles. “I generally like rock music. Sorry that I do not have enough time to practice my guitar.”  

 

Coming to the London Olympics, Shubenkov was not considered as a favourite, but still the pressure played a trick with him. Sergey ran in the semi-final 0.32 slower than his fresh PB and naturally was eliminated.

 

“I underestimated the magic of the Olympics,” Shubenkov admitted. “I thought all I had to do was to run the same 10 hurdles as usual, what can be easier. But the Olympic atmosphere turned out to be completely different. I even don’t know how to explain this. In theory, my shape was good enough. But in reality, right after the start my emotions completely destroyed my technique and race plan.”

 

The following winter Shubenkov confirmed his status of absolutely best European hurdler winning European Indoors in his new PB 7.49. Still this was considered by Sergey and his coach Sergey Klevtsov only a preparation step for the summer. “I really like 110m hurdles much more than 60m,” Shubenkov explains.

 

The highlight of mid season for him was an unexpected meeting with Colin Jackson in his home town of Barnaul. The IAAF ambassador Jackson made a special trip to Siberia to meet the Russian rising star. Shubenkov had been dreaming for years to meet his athletics idol, and was more than surprised one day to see Colin waiting for him at the training venue.

 

“To say that I was shocked is to say nothing,” Shubenkov comments. “During the IAAF Media training in February I just mentioned that I would like to meet Colin one day. Of course I immediately forgot about it. And imagine my feeling, when I discovered Colin at my home stadium and learnt that my friends from IAAF had organised his visit specially to see me. We had an amazing time together – held a master class for kids, chatted a lot and even interviewed each other!”

 

During their unusual meeting Shubenkov definitely asked Jackson his advice how to prepare for the home World Championships in Moscow. For the first time Shubenkov was approaching the main start of the season as one of the home stars and not an underdog.

 

After a number of successful Diamond League appearances, Sergey’s first disappointment in 2013 came at the World Universiade in Kazan. Shubenkov sensationally finished only third in the final, losing to his main home rival Konstantin Shabanov and American Eddie Lovett. “To be honest I have no explanation what happened. It was just a bad day for me,” Shubenkov commented.

 

Thanks to this misfortune or not, but at the World Championships in Moscow Shubenkov was more fit and motivated than ever. And though his final result 13.24 was still worse than his own national record, this was still enough to take the bronze medal, which is the first ever in the history of Russian men hurdles.

 

“I became sick and tired of European titles and decided to go on the world level,” Shubenkov joked.

 

Now Sergey has a new chance to gain another World medal – indoors one, in Sopot. And though Shubenkov says that still prefers to run 110 meters, he naturally is not going to let this chance fade away.    

 

Personal Bests

110m Hurdles: 13.09 NR (2012)

60m Hurdles:  7.49i (2013)

Yearly Progression

60/110m Hurdles: 2010: 7.81/13.54; 2011: 7.87/13.46; 2012: 7.56/13.09; 2013: 7.49/13.16; 2014: 7.55/-.

Career Highlights

2009

1st

(110m H, 99 cm)

Russian Junior Championships (Saransk)

13.38 (+2.4)

2009

2nd

(110m H, 99 cm)

European Junior Championships (Novi Sad)

13.40 (13.35 sf)

2010

1st

(60m H)

Russian Indoor U23 Championships (Volgograd)

7.81

2010

4th

(60m H)

Russian Indoor Championships (Moscow)

7.81

2010

1st

(110m H)

Russian Team Championships (Sochi)

13.77

2010

3rd

(110m H)

Russian Championships (Saransk)

13.61 (+3.0)

2011

h

(60m H)

Russian Indoor Championships (Moscow)

7.90

2011

2nd

(60m H)

Russian Indoor U23 Championships (Volgograd)

7.87

2011

1st

(110m H)

Russian Team Championships (Sochi)

13.76

2011

2nd

(110m H)

Russian U23 Championships (Erino)

13.46

2011

1st

(110m H)

European U23 Championships (Ostrava)

13.56

2011

h

(110m H)

World Championships (Daegu)

13.70

2012

1st

(60m H)

Russian U23 Indoor Championships (Saransk)

7.56

2012

1st

(110m H)

Russian Team Championships (Sochi)

13.41

2012

1st

(110m H)

European Championships (Helsinki)

13.16 (13.09 sf)

2012

6th sf

(110m H)

Olympic Games (London)

13.41

2013

1st

(60m H)

Russian Indoor Championships (Moscow)

7.50

2013

1st`

(60m H)

European Indoor Championships (Gothenburg)

7.49

2013

1st

(110m H)

European Team Championships (Gateshead)

13.19

2013

3rd

(110m H)

World Universiade (Kazan)

13.47

2013

1st

(110m H)

Russian Championships (Moscow)

13.19

2013

3rd`

(110m H)

World Championships (Moscow)

13.24

2014

1st

(60m H)

Russian Indoor Championships (Moscow)

7.55

  

Prepared by Natalia Maryanchik for the IAAF “Focus on Athletes” project. Copyright IAAF 2012-2014.

 

 

 

Personal Best - Outdoor
Performance Wind Place Date
110m Hurdles (99.0cm) 13.35 +1.7 Novi Sad 24 JUL 2009
110 Metres Hurdles 13.09 0.0 Linz 20 AUG 2012
110 Metres Hurdles 13.09 -1.1 Helsinki 01 JUL 2012
110 Metres Hurdles 13.09 0.0 Monaco 20 JUL 2012
Personal Best - Indoor
Performance Wind Place Date
60 Metres Hurdles 7.49 Göteborg (Scandinavium) 01 MAR 2013
Progression - Outdoor showShow All Graphs
110m Hurdles (99.0cm) Show Graphshow
Performance Wind Place Date
2009 13.35 +1.7 Novi Sad 24 JUL
110 Metres Hurdles Show Graphshow
Performance Wind Place Date
2013 13.16 -0.6 Moskva (Luzhniki) 11 AUG
2012 13.09 0.0 Linz 20 AUG
2012 13.09 0.0 Monaco 20 JUL
2012 13.09 -1.1 Helsinki 01 JUL
2011 13.46 +0.8 Yerino 24 JUN
2010 13.54 +1.5 Saransk 12 AUG
Progression - Indoor showShow All Graphs
60 Metres Hurdles Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2014 7.55 Moskva (CSKA) 18 FEB
2014 7.55 Moskva (CSKA) 02 FEB
2013 7.49 Göteborg (Scandinavium) 01 MAR
2012 7.56 Saransk 02 MAR
2010 7.81 Moskva 26 FEB
Honours - 60 Metres Hurdles
Rank Mark Wind Place Date
IAAF World Indoor Championships 2014 7sf2 7.66 Sopot (Ergo Arena) 09 MAR 2014
Honours - 110 Metres Hurdles
Rank Mark Wind Place Date
14th IAAF World Championships 3 13.24 +0.3 Moskva (Luzhniki) 12 AUG 2013
The XXX Olympic Games 6sf3 13.41 +0.1 London (OP) 08 AUG 2012
13th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 6h1 13.70 +1.0 Daegu 28 AUG 2011

Focus on Athletes biographies are produced by the IAAF Communications Dept, and not by the IAAF Statistics and Documentation Division. If you have any enquiries concerning the information, please use the Contact IAAF page, selecting ‘Focus on Athletes Biographies’ in the drop down menu of contact area options.

Updated 28 February 2014

 

Sergey SHUBENKOV, Russia (110 m Hurdles)

Born: 4 October 1990, Barnaul, Siberia

185 cm/ 75 kg

Coach: Sergey Klevtsov

 

"Wonder boy" Shubenkov recently became the first ever Russian male hurdler to medal st the World Championships, after becoming third at the home World Championships. Moreover Shubenkov also beat the Russian record which was two years older than him and became the first European champion in the history of Russian high hurdles. In the country where men sprinters could not even qualify for the Olympics, Shubenkov is the only rising sprint star for ages.

 

"In hurdles the situation in Russia is generally better than in flat sprints,” Shubenkov comments. "In my event people regularly took part at the Olympics and the World Championships, so it was easier for me as I felt part of the tradition.”

 

Shubenkov's amazing progress happened exactly in the Olympic season. In one year, he managed to improve his PB by almost half a second - from 13.46 to 13.09. What is even more amazing for Russian reality, in the previous years Shubenkov's progress was slowed down by his studies.

 

"For four years I studied to be a lawyer in my home town at Barnaul University,” Shubenkov says. "It was not just a formality, I went to the University every day except when I was away at the training camps or competitions. Now that I've got my diploma, I have much more time for trainings. And also, my coach changed several things in my physical and technical preparation. This all together helped me to improve my results.”

 

Shubenkov was born in the city of Barnaul, which is in Siberia. This is the hometown of Olympic medallist long jumper Tatyana Kotova and also Sergey's mother, European 1986 silver medallist in heptathlon Natalya Shubenkova.

 

"When I started athletics, I was running sprints and long jumping,” Shubenkov recalls. "At 14 I jumped about 6 meters, and ran 200m indoors in 22.30. Actually I don't know what would be my 100m result now. I've never run this distance with electronic timing, but I think in good shape I could run in about 10.6.”

 

10.6 would be enough to qualify for the final of the Russian championships, but naturally Shubenkov is not interested. His first success came in 2009 when he became silver medallist at the European Junior Championships in Novi Sad. However, Shubenkov still considers that experience to be the biggest disappointment in his career.

 

 

"I had to win, I came to the Championships as a favourite and was feeling great,” Shubenkov says. "After the first half of the race I was leading. But then I felt like everything was over, I already imagined myself as a champion and relaxed. At this moment the guy from the UK surpassed me and won. After this, I always run till the finish line.”

 

Since 2010 Shubenkov started to compete with seniors. He was 3rd at the Russian Championships, in Saransk, but did not qualify to the European Championships in Barcelona. A year later, Sergey made a step forward. First he won the European U23 Champs in Ostrava, and then qualified to his first senior World Championships in Daegu.

 

“To be honest, I realised that in Daegu I had absolutely no chance to make it to the final,” Shubenkov admitted. “I was more like a tourist in the team. I happened to be in the same heat as the Olympic champion, Liu Xiang. When I went on the track, I saw that the whole stands opposite me were red because of Chinese flags. I was impressed, embarrassed, I was totally confused! I’ve never before experienced such pressure. In the end I ran 0.2 second slower than I actually could.”

 

The next season, 2012, Shubenkov managed to overcome this fear of full stands and big stadiums. In Helsinki Sergey won his first senior title of European champion and in the semi-finals set the new Russian record, 13.09.

 

“It was totally unexpected,” Shubenkov says. “I just wanted to perform my race technically well, and suddenly saw the figures of the national record. I was completely uptight in the finals, and it was extremely hard to pull myself together. But I remembered what happened back in 2009, in Novi Sad, and made myself run 100 per cent. The gold medal was my best prize for that.”

 

Thanks to this gold, Shubenkov got a bye from the national trials in Cheboksary. Instead, Sergey together with his coach Sergey Klevtsov could go to Barnaul and start training for the Olympics. Although the conditions in which Shubenkov trains deserve separate note.

 

“The new track on our stadium was meant for indoors, and so now the track is full of bubbles. We have also another stadium, but there the track is full of hummocks. Maybe it is ok for long distances, but with hurdles I feel them all very well. The indoor stadium has a very old track which has not been renewed for ages.” 

 

“Still, I prefer to train in my home city than away on the training camp,” Shubenkov continues. “It is psychologically very hard to be away from family for such a long time. I think it makes no good when you spend half a year in camps.”

 

Being at home means for Shubenkov not only training and studying. Already for several years he has been taking guitar lessons. “I do not play guitar well, but I like it,” Shubenkov smiles. “I generally like rock music. Sorry that I do not have enough time to practice my guitar.”  

 

Coming to the London Olympics, Shubenkov was not considered as a favourite, but still the pressure played a trick with him. Sergey ran in the semi-final 0.32 slower than his fresh PB and naturally was eliminated.

 

“I underestimated the magic of the Olympics,” Shubenkov admitted. “I thought all I had to do was to run the same 10 hurdles as usual, what can be easier. But the Olympic atmosphere turned out to be completely different. I even don’t know how to explain this. In theory, my shape was good enough. But in reality, right after the start my emotions completely destroyed my technique and race plan.”

 

The following winter Shubenkov confirmed his status of absolutely best European hurdler winning European Indoors in his new PB 7.49. Still this was considered by Sergey and his coach Sergey Klevtsov only a preparation step for the summer. “I really like 110m hurdles much more than 60m,” Shubenkov explains.

 

The highlight of mid season for him was an unexpected meeting with Colin Jackson in his home town of Barnaul. The IAAF ambassador Jackson made a special trip to Siberia to meet the Russian rising star. Shubenkov had been dreaming for years to meet his athletics idol, and was more than surprised one day to see Colin waiting for him at the training venue.

 

“To say that I was shocked is to say nothing,” Shubenkov comments. “During the IAAF Media training in February I just mentioned that I would like to meet Colin one day. Of course I immediately forgot about it. And imagine my feeling, when I discovered Colin at my home stadium and learnt that my friends from IAAF had organised his visit specially to see me. We had an amazing time together – held a master class for kids, chatted a lot and even interviewed each other!”

 

During their unusual meeting Shubenkov definitely asked Jackson his advice how to prepare for the home World Championships in Moscow. For the first time Shubenkov was approaching the main start of the season as one of the home stars and not an underdog.

 

After a number of successful Diamond League appearances, Sergey’s first disappointment in 2013 came at the World Universiade in Kazan. Shubenkov sensationally finished only third in the final, losing to his main home rival Konstantin Shabanov and American Eddie Lovett. “To be honest I have no explanation what happened. It was just a bad day for me,” Shubenkov commented.

 

Thanks to this misfortune or not, but at the World Championships in Moscow Shubenkov was more fit and motivated than ever. And though his final result 13.24 was still worse than his own national record, this was still enough to take the bronze medal, which is the first ever in the history of Russian men hurdles.

 

“I became sick and tired of European titles and decided to go on the world level,” Shubenkov joked.

 

Now Sergey has a new chance to gain another World medal – indoors one, in Sopot. And though Shubenkov says that still prefers to run 110 meters, he naturally is not going to let this chance fade away.    

 

Personal Bests

110m Hurdles: 13.09 NR (2012)

60m Hurdles:  7.49i (2013)

Yearly Progression

60/110m Hurdles: 2010: 7.81/13.54; 2011: 7.87/13.46; 2012: 7.56/13.09; 2013: 7.49/13.16; 2014: 7.55/-.

Career Highlights

2009

1st

(110m H, 99 cm)

Russian Junior Championships (Saransk)

13.38 (+2.4)

2009

2nd

(110m H, 99 cm)

European Junior Championships (Novi Sad)

13.40 (13.35 sf)

2010

1st

(60m H)

Russian Indoor U23 Championships (Volgograd)

7.81

2010

4th

(60m H)

Russian Indoor Championships (Moscow)

7.81

2010

1st

(110m H)

Russian Team Championships (Sochi)

13.77

2010

3rd

(110m H)

Russian Championships (Saransk)

13.61 (+3.0)

2011

h

(60m H)

Russian Indoor Championships (Moscow)

7.90

2011

2nd

(60m H)

Russian Indoor U23 Championships (Volgograd)

7.87

2011

1st

(110m H)

Russian Team Championships (Sochi)

13.76

2011

2nd

(110m H)

Russian U23 Championships (Erino)

13.46

2011

1st

(110m H)

European U23 Championships (Ostrava)

13.56

2011

h

(110m H)

World Championships (Daegu)

13.70

2012

1st

(60m H)

Russian U23 Indoor Championships (Saransk)

7.56

2012

1st

(110m H)

Russian Team Championships (Sochi)

13.41

2012

1st

(110m H)

European Championships (Helsinki)

13.16 (13.09 sf)

2012

6th sf

(110m H)

Olympic Games (London)

13.41

2013

1st

(60m H)

Russian Indoor Championships (Moscow)

7.50

2013

1st`

(60m H)

European Indoor Championships (Gothenburg)

7.49

2013

1st

(110m H)

European Team Championships (Gateshead)

13.19

2013

3rd

(110m H)

World Universiade (Kazan)

13.47

2013

1st

(110m H)

Russian Championships (Moscow)

13.19

2013

3rd`

(110m H)

World Championships (Moscow)

13.24

2014

1st

(60m H)

Russian Indoor Championships (Moscow)

7.55

  

Prepared by Natalia Maryanchik for the IAAF “Focus on Athletes” project. Copyright IAAF 2012-2014.