19 JUN 2003 General News

Venezuela to host Historic South American Championships

Robson da Silva in action (Eduardo Biscayart for the IAAF)Robson da Silva in action (Eduardo Biscayart for the IAAF) © Copyright

Barquisimeto, Venezuela  For the first time in the history of the country, Venezuela will host this weekend the 42nd edition of the South American Championships, the oldest area championships in the World. The venue will be the “Estadio Máximo Viloria” in the city of Barquisimeto, capital of the State of Lara.

Barquisimeto was founded in 1552 by Juan de Villegas, under the name of “Nueva Segovia de Buría”. The city is located at an altitude of 552 meters above sea level, and has a population of approximately 800,000.

The rich history of the South American Championships started in Montevideo, Uruguay, back in 1919. In those championships, only Uruguay, Chile and Argentina took part. Brazil competed in the event for the first time in the 7th edition, which took place in Buenos Aires in 1931.

The event has been held biannually since 1961, with the exception of 1973, when the competition was moved to 1974, but then it continued its periodicity in 1975.

The first time women competed was in the 11th edition, which happened in Lima, Peru.

Since 1919, the biggest names of the athletics history of the continent left their mark in the event, with names such as Luis Antonio Brunetto (ARG), Manuel Plaza (CHI), Juan Carlos Zabala (ARG), Delfo Cabrera (ARG), Noemí Simonetto (ARG), José Telles da Conceição (BRA), Adhemar Ferreira da Silva (BRA), Arnoldo Devonish (VEN), Marlene Ahrens (CHI), Nelson Prudêncio (BRA), João Carlos de Oliveira (BRA), Joaquim Cruz (BRA), Robson Caetano da Silva (BRA), Ximena Restrepo (COL) and Jefferson Pérez (ECU), which are all of South American Olympic medalists -along with Panama’s Lloyd LaBeach.

Those greats, along with others, have enriched the history of this traditional event.

Santiago de Chile has been the most repeated venue, by hosting 7 editions, and Brazil has been the dominating country since 1974. Actually, the last country to take an overall title was Venezuela in Santiago de Chile 1974, when they won the men’s competition. Since then, it’s been all “verdeamarelho”.

The athletes with most individual titles are Manuel Plaza and Osvaldo Suárez (ARG) with 11, followed by Robson da Silva with 10 and Valerio Vallania (ARG) with 9, on the men’s side.

Conceição Aperecida Geremias with 10 is the most decorated women, followed by Alejandra Ramos (CHI) with 9, and Brazil’s Silvina das Graças Pereira, Wanda dos Santos and Elisângela Adriano with 8.

No world records have been set at the event, though Adhemar Ferreira da Silva was 1cm short of the Triple Jump WR in 1954. Adhemar had won the Olympic title in Helsinki ’52 with a mark of 16.22m, but Soviet Leonid Shcherbakov jumped 16.23 in Moscow on July 19, 1953 to improve that performance.

At the 18th edition of the South American’s in São Paulo, Adhemar jumped 16.22, to equal his own personal record on April 21st, and one year later, at the 2nd edition of the Pan American Games in Ciudad de México, the great Brazilian leaped to 16.56m, a World Record that stood for 3 years, and was his all-time best.

In recent years, Maurren Higa Maggi also obtained a remarkable performance in the Long Jump, by registering 7.26 in Bogotá ’99. That mark led the World Lists that year, and placed her in the 9th  in the all-time rankings.

Last year, the South American Confederation (Consudatle) published a book with the history of all South American Championships. Edited by Edgardo Fontana, Winfried Kramer and Luis Vinker, the book has full results, details, statistics and profiles of the most important South American athletes.

The last edition took place in Manaus, Brazil in 2001. There the hosts won 33 gold medals (and a total of 69), followed by Argentina with 5 (17 in total).

Brazil comes to Barquisimeto with a very powerful team, which includes sprinters André da Silva, Claudinei da Silva, Geisa Coutinho, and jumpers like Maggi or Jadel Gregório.

Argentina has its best hopes of gold in throwers Marcelo Pugliese and Juan Cerra, and vaulter Alejandra García, Chile in putter Marco Antonio Verni, Colombia in Zuleima Araméndiz and Sabina Moya in the Javelin, and Venezuela in the men’s Javelin with Manuel Fuenmayor.

The competition starts on Friday 20th and will end on Sunday 22nd.

South American Championships – Championships Records
Men

100m
10.16A/0.4
André Domingos da Silva
BRA
Bogotá (heats)
1999
200m
20.44A 
Robson Caetano da Silva
BRA
Medellín
1989
400m
45.11
Sanderlei Claro Parrela
BRA
Manaus
2001
800m
1:46.16
José Luiz Barbosa
BRA
Manaus
1995
1500m
3:36.47
Hudson Santos de Souza
BRA
Manaus
2001
5000m
13:51.66
Ronaldo da Costa
BRA
Manaus
1995
10000m
28:37.2
Antonio Silio
ARG
Lima
1993
100mh
13.64/0.0
Márcio Simão de Souza
BRA
Manaus
2001
400mh
48.63
Eronilde Nunes de Araújo
BRA
Manaus
1995
3000m St
8:35.40
Wander do Prado Moura
BRA
Mar del Plata
1997
HJ
2.26
Gilmar Mayo
COL
Mar del Plata
1997
 
2.26A
Fabrício de Azevedo Romero
BRA
Bogotá (1º)
1999
 
2.26A
Gilmar Mayo
COL
Bogotá (2º)
1999
PV
5.40
Javier Benítez
ARG
Manaus
2001
LJ
8.05/0.9
Douglas de Souza
BRA
Manaus (1º)
1995
 
8.05/0.4
Nelson Carlos Ferreira
BRA
Manaus (2º)
1995
TJ
17.21
Anísio Souza Silva
BRA
Lima
1993
SP
20.14
Gert Weil
CHI
Santiago de Chile
1985
DT
59.46
Ramón Jiménez Gaona
PAR
Lima
1993
HT
73.95
Juan Ignacio Cerra
ARG
Manaus
2001
JT
78.89A
Nery Kennedy
PAR
Bogotá
1999
Decathlon
7564
Édson Luques Bindilatti
BRA
Manaus
2001
 
 
11.13/-0.6 6.96/-0.9 12.46 
2.08 47.85 15.18/0.0 37.94
4.60 44.24 4:28.37
4x100m
38.46A
Brazil
 
Bogotá
1999
 
 
Raphael de Oliveira, 
Claudinei da Silva,
Édson Ribeiro,
André da Silva
4x400m
3:02.09A
Brazil
 
Bogotá
1999
 
 
Eronilde de Araújo, 
Anderson J. dos Santos,
Inácio Leão,
Cleverson da Silva
20.000m W
1:23:06.8
Héctor Moreno
COL
Mar del Plata
1997

 

Women
 
100m
11.17A/1.3
Lucimar Aparecida de Moura
BRA
Bogotá (heats)
1999
 
11.17A/0.3
Lucimar Aparecida de Moura
BRA
Bogotá (final)
1999
200m
22.60A/1.6
Lucimar Aparecida de Moura
BRA
Bogotá
1999
400m
51.56
Maria Magnólia Figueirêdo
BRA
Manaus
1991
800m
2:00.04
Luciana de Paula Mendes
BRA
Manaus
1991
1500m
4:19.18
Rita de Cássia Santos de Jesus
BRA
Manaus
1991
5000m
15:48.82
Stella Castro
COL
Mar del Plata
1997
10000m
33:24.07
Stella Castro
COL
Mar del Plata
1997
100mh
12.71/0.1
Maurren Higa Maggi
BRA
Manaus
2001
400mh
57.16
Liliana Chalá
ECU
Manaus
1991
HJ
1.89
Orlane Maria Lima dos Santos
BRA
Manaus
1991
 
1.89
Solange Witteveen
ARG
Mar del Plata
1997
PV
4.30A
Alejandra García
ARG
Bogotá
1999
LJ
7.26/1.8
Maurren Higa Maggi
BRA
Bogotá
1999
TJ
13.91/1.3
Andrea Ávila
ARG
Lima
1993
SP
19.02A
Elisângela Maria Adriano
BRA
Bogotá
1999
DT
60.27A
Elisângela Maria Adriano
BRA
Bogotá
1999
HT
60.83
Karina Moya
ARG
Manaus
2001
JT
58.81A
Sabina Moya
COL
Bogotá
1991
Heptathlon
5741A
Euzinete Reis
BRA
Bogotá
1999
 
 
13.97/0.0 1.72 12.47 
24.40/1.9 6.09/-0.4
41.32 2:31.49
4x100m
44.12A
Colombia
 
Bogotá
1999
 
 
Norfalia Carabalí, 
Patricia Rodríguez,
Felipa Palacios,
Mirtha Brock
4x400m
3:32.43
Brazil
 
Manaus
2001
 
 
Maria Laura Almirão, 
Maria Magnólia Figueirêdo,
Lucimar Teodoro,
Luciana Mendes