Tirunesh Dibaba (Getty Images)
Tirunesh Dibaba (Getty Images)
  • COUNTRY Ethiopia Ethiopia
  • DATE OF BIRTH 1 JUN 1985

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Updated 9 August 2013

TIRUNESH Dibaba, Ethiopia (3000/5000m/10,000m, Cross Country)

Born 1 June, 1985, Chefe, near Bekoji, Arsi region, Ethiopia

Height: 1.55m             Weight: 44kg

Lives in Addis Ababa Club: Corrections (Prison Police) Manager: Mark Wetmore

Coaches: Hussein Shebo (club)

Fourth of six children. Older sister Ejegayehu (b. 1982) is 2004 Olympic silver medalist at 10,000m and 2011 Chicago marathon runner-up; younger brother Dejene (b. 1989) shows promise; younger sister Genzebe (b. 1990) is the 2008 and 2009 World Cross Country Championships junior champion and 2012 World Indoor 1500 Champion. Former Olympic champion Derartu Tulu is their cousin.

 Married Olympic 10,000m silver medalist Sileshi Sihine October 2008.

 The Dibaba sisters grew up near the town of Bekoji hearing about their cousin Derartu winning two Olympic gold medals and a World Championship at 10,000m, but their early athletic efforts were most directly inspired by another cousin, Bekelu Dibaba (whom they refer to as their sister), a moderately successful international runner now living in Belgium. Tirunesh’s older sister Ejegayehu began running competitively in 1998; Tirunesh followed a year later.

 Tirunesh moved to Addis Ababa in 2000 to live with her sister and cousin while finishing high school. She arrived too late for school registration, however, and facing the choice of returning to Bekoji or finding something to do in the city, she turned to running. With the help of Bekelu, a member of the Corrections police sports club, Tirunesh joined the club and began training fulltime. Within a year she qualified for Ethiopia’s 2001 junior World Cross team and, not yet 16, finished a close 5th in Ostend.

 In her first full year of international running, 2002, Tirunesh fell just short of the top spot in several major competitions. She was runner-up to Kenya's Viola Kibiwot in the Junior Women's race at the World Cross in Dublin, to Deena Drossin's World road best in the Carlsbad (California) 5 km, to her teammate Meseret Defar in the 5000m at the World Junior Championships in Jamaica, and to Werknesh Kidane in the Great Ethiopian Run 10K. The following year, she broke out in the most emphatic way, winning the 5000m at the Paris World Championships and becoming the youngest individual winner in the history of the championships. Yet for all her youth, Tirunesh’s performances earlier in 2003 had showed her potential.

 She streaked past favored Werknesh to take the 4km title at Ethiopia’s World Cross trials, and strode to a clear win in the junior World Cross in Lausanne. In June, she followed a 5000m World record attempt in Oslo til the final 200m, setting a World junior record (14:39.94) in third place in the process. And in July she won the Ethiopian title at 5000 over a formidable field.

 2004 was a year of mixed results. In early January, she defeated cousin Derartu for the first time in Newcastle's Great North Cross Country. She set two indoor World junior records, 14:53.99 for 5000 in Boston and 8:33.56 for 3000m in Birmingham. She took 2nd in the 4 km race at the World Cross in Brussels and notched her second outdoor World junior mark (14:30.88) in the Bislett GL 5000, assuring her selection for the Olympics.

 In the Athens 5000m final, she followed Ethiopian-born Turk Elvan Abeylegesse but couldn’t stay with Kenya’s Isabella Ochichi’s lead in the oppressive heat. As Meseret sprinted past the Kenyan with 200m to go, Tirunesh took bronze, becoming the youngest ever Ethiopian Olympic medallist.

 Early in 2005 she smashed the World 5000m indoor record in Boston, her 14:32.93 taking nearly seven seconds off Berhane Adere’s mark. Back in Addis Ababa for the Ethiopian World Cross trials, she sprinted past Meselech Melkamu in a thrilling finish to take the 8 km title and was named to both the short and long course World Cross teams in view of her form, which she declared the best ever. In France, she became the second woman after Ireland’s Sonia O’Sullivan in 1998 and the third athlete after her compatriot Kenenisa Bekele to take double gold, signalling that 2005 was to be her year.

 A week later, Tirunesh matched Briton Paula Radcliffe’s recognised 5K road World best of 14:51 at the Carlsbad 5000. At the Helsinki World Championships, Tirunesh eclipsed her own World Cross double by becoming the first woman to achieve distance double gold on the track. She beat defending champion Berhane in a 58.53 last lap sprint and led her and her own sister Ejegayehu in a 10,000m sweep, before spearheading a historic sweep of the top four places in the 5000m, outsprinting Meseret in a 58.19 last 400m, with Ejegayehu taking bronze and Meselech Melkamu fourth. Tirunesh collected the IAAF award for the female Performance of the Year for her Championships efforts.

 

An attempt at a second golden World Cross double in Fukuoka was her season’s focus but illness cost Tirunesh three days’ training in the week before the 2006 Championships, and she suffered from stitches during the long course race in which the Netherlands’ Lornah Kiplagat took the lead almost from the gun until the bell lap. But Tirunesh remained in contact and kicked ferociously on the final hill, successfully defending her title.

 Tirunesh’s outdoor season was dominated by her bid for six Golden League wins and a share of the $1 million jackpot. She took a decisive victory in Oslo, winning the 5000m in a personal best 14:30.40  but the competition heated up when Meseret, fresh off a 14:24.53 World record run in New York on 3 June, joined the hunt for 5 GL wins and a share of half of the jackpot. Sparks flew in the close finishes of each race, and Tirunesh prevailed in Paris, Rome and Brussels and won in Zurich in Meseret’s absence, remaining undefeated in 5 GL outings and guaranteeing a share of the jackpot. But at the African Championships in Mauritius, Tirunesh, recovering from illness, lost badly to Meseret over 5000m. And then, at the final GL meet in Berlin on 3 September, where Tirunesh was one of four athletes poised to take a share of the larger jackpot by pulling off a 6th win,  Meseret’s last lap chase and win deprived Tirunesh of an additional $125,000 a win could have netted her. 

 The pair battled again down the homestretch at the World Athletics Final, Tirunesh getting her revenge over 5000m in a photo finish and Meseret prevailing in the 3000. Both women topped the podium at the Athens World Cup, with Defar taking the 5000m crown while the “baby-faced destroyer,” as Tirunesh has come to be described, won the 3000m.

 In 2007, Tirunesh smashed her own World indoor 5000m record in Boston on 27 January, slicing 5 and a half seconds off to clock 14:27.42, and she focused on the defense of her 8K title at the World Cross Country Championships in Mombasa, where she was heavily favoured. But she (along with almost the entire Ethiopian team) was defeated by the coastal city’s heat and humidity and she took silver behind the Netherlands’ Lornah Kiplagat, while holding off the in-form Meselech.

 Tirunesh raced sparingly that summer and in her defense of her Helsinki crowns in Osaka, she was hampered by a mid-race tumble and abdominal pains in the 10,000 that left her periodically clutching her stomach. She overcame both to win the longer race (in 31:55.41), but only through a heroic effort, and she withdrew from the 5000 (which Meseret won). The abdominal pain continued to dog her afterwards.

 Tirunesh then focused on regaining the title she lost in Mombasa at the Edinburgh World Cross Country Championships in 2008. Just as the tone of the day in Mombasa had been set by the disastrous outing of the junior women, including Genzebe, the theme in Edinburgh was indicated by Ethiopia’s gold in that race, won by Genzebe herself in a sprint. Inspired by her sister, Tirunesh clawed her way back to the lead group of the senior race after falling behind midway due to a recurrence of abdominal pain. In the last 400m, she reined in Kenya’s Linet Masai, Edinburgh cross country meet winner Gelete Burka and eventual silver medallist Mestawet Tufa to join her cousin Derartu, American Lynn Jennings and Norwegian Grete Waitz in the ranks of women who have won cross country gold at least three times. Ethiopia went on to sweep all four individual titles in Edinburgh.

 The once reticent Tirunesh, who is still shy but less so than when greatness was first thrust upon her, now embraces the expectations placed upon her, and she lived up to Ethiopia’s anticipation of a medal sweep in the 2008 African Championships 10,000m in Addis Ababa in May, where she led her sister and Wude Ayalew across the line.

 Greater things were to come in the season, however, and she slashed Meseret’s 14:16.63 2007 World 5000m record to 14:11.15 in Oslo on June 6. Tirunesh ran 31:03.37 for 10,000 in Ostrava and was entered in both events at the Olympics, where she sought to repeat the double she completed at the Worlds in 2005.

 In Beijing, Tirunesh not only demolished her opponents over 10,000m, including a relentless Abeylegesse, but she ran a stunning 29:54.66, a clocking that had been surpassed only by the 1993 29:31.78 World record of China’s Wang Junxia. Though its pedestrian pace yielded a tame finish, the 5000m final days later also saw Tirunesh and Abeylegesse climb to the top of the podium, with 2004 defending champion Meseret relegated to bronze. Tirunesh had again done something no other woman before her had accomplished: take distance double gold at the Olympics.

 Tirunesh and two-time Olympic 10,000m silver medalist Sileshi Sihine were married in a lavish ceremony in Addis Ababa on 26 October, when throngs lined the streets to wish the happy couple well between their wedding day festivities at various venues. Having taken a lengthy break, Tirunesh resumed training a couple of months later, only to suffer an injury, later determined to be shin splints.

 She skipped the entire cross country and indoor season and avoided hard track training and returned to competition in New York on 30 May 2009. “I haven’t trained as much on the track as before because of my leg injury,” said Tirunesh, before suffering a rare defeat over 5000m and taking second to Kenyan Linet Masai in 14:40.93. Tirunesh withdrew from a much-anticipated clash with Meseret over the distance in Oslo and competed just one other time during the season, displaying her form with a world-leading 14:33.65 in London on 25 July.

 Tirunesh was entered in both the 10,000 and 5000m at the 2009 World Championships, but in the days before the start of competition, she interrupted a training session due to injury to her left big toe and sought medical attention, following which she eventually pulled out of both championship races.

 She returned to competition at the September World Athletics Final 5000m, where she placed second over 5000 behind Meseret, but it was on 15 November when she joined her husband at the Nijmegen 15K road race that she proved her fitness.  “We prepared for the competition together … I felt very good during the race,” said Tirunesh, who ran a World record 46.28 in her debut over the distance.

 Tirunesh was defeated only once in eight outings in 2010. She began by dominating in the snow of the Great Edinburgh cross country 6K on 9 January, where she kicked in the final lap and won by an 8-second margin over Kenya’s 2009 World 5000m champion, Vivian Cheruiyot, and emerging Ethiopian star, Kalkidan Gezahegn (who later took World Indoor 1500m gold). Though an assault be Tirunesh's on the World two-mile best in Birmingham was unsuccessful, it gave her a swift 9:12.23 finish, more than 10 seconds ahead of runner-up Cheruiyot.

 Nevertheless, Tirunesh said that she felt her 15K road training in late 2009 interfered with her work over shorter distances and left her hesitant to compete at the 2010 World Cross Country Championships that she had initially intended to contest. When asked in March by the Ethiopian federation to represent the nation in Bydgoszcz, however, she headed up the team on less-than-usual preparation, and was dropped by Emily Chebet and Linet Masai of Kenya and Meselech Melkamu, who medaled ahead of her fourth place finish. Tirunesh did rack up a 20th World Cross medal with the team silver she helped garner, though.

 Tirunesh saw the abdominal pains that plagued her in the past resurface intermittently, but she won both of her 5000m races at Diamond League meets in New York and Eugene, running a 57-second final lap in the former.

 In the African Athletics Championships 10,000m in Nairobi, Tirunesh faced the reigning World 10,000 and Cross Country medalist Meselech and the World 10,000 Champion Masai racing on home turf. Tirunesh headed to Kenya undefeated in six career races over 10,000m from her debut in 2005 till her Beijing victory.

 In her defense of her 2008 African title, Tirunesh followed Masai’s lead until the final lap, when she sprinted past the Kenyan, taking Ethiopia’s only gold of the 2010 championships in 31:51.39 well clear of Meselech and Masai. Tirunesh confirmed she was indeed back to winning form when she again beat a strong field at the London Aviva Diamond League 5000 on 13 August. A 59-second last lap took her to a 14:36.41 victory over African 5000 champion Cheruiyot (14:38.17), the then-Diamond League leader Sentayehu Ejigu, and Masai.

 Tirunesh experienced a recurrence of the shin injury that eventually cost her all of 2011 after she withdrew from the Prefontaine Classic 5000 and missed the 2011 Daegu world championships. “I experienced a lot of pain,” she said.

 Her first race back was a road 10K on New Year’s Eve in Madrid, where she returned to winning ways, prevailing in a sprint duel over Gelete, with both women clocking 31.30. “Today was my first competition for so long, I have to be satisfied,” she told the IAAF website. “I’m now fully recovered from injury, my trainings are going well.” Indoors in Boston, in February 2012, she ran 9:21.60 for two miles with some two months and three track sessions under her belt since resuming training.

 

She limited her outdoor build-up to the London Olympics to just one track race over 5000 and 10,000 each after kicking off the season in April with a victory at the Carlsbad 5000 on the road in 15:01 over Werknesh Kidane. “I hadn’t raced in a while then and there was a bit of a wind, so I didn’t run as fast a time as I wanted,” said Tirunesh.

 Her 1 June Prefontaine Classic race in Eugene put her at the top of the list of London-bound Ethiopian women in the 10,000 when she grabbed her side during the race due to a return of the old abdominal pains, but still hung on to kick past her fellow Ethiopian and London berth seeker Belaynesh Oljira and Kenyan Florence Kiplagat, winning in 30:24.39. “It was my first track race outdoors and I had prepared well for it,” said Tirunesh. “I had pain during the race and if it hadn’t been for that, I expected to run a fast time.” Werknesh completed the Ethiopian trio that earned Olympic slots there.

 The 9 June New York DL gave spectators an unexpected treat when Meseret was added to the 5000m field, but Tirunesh easily took the measure of her rival, running a decisive last lap to win. “Because I raced last week, I didn’t want to follow the pacers,” she said. “I aimed to win and I planned to kick at the end, and that’s what I did.” The 14:50.80 finish, however, was only the year’s fourth-fastest among her compatriots. Season bests being Ethiopia’s primary selection criterion for the Olympics, Tirunesh was named a reserve on that event, behind Meseret, Gelete and the less experienced Genet Yalew.

 The athletics federation also looks at runners’ current fitness both in naming the entries of three athletes and a reserve, and in determining which of the four athletes will eventually run, and Tirunesh eventually doubled in London in a bid to defend her Beijing titles.

 But first she led Belaynesh and Werknesh in the 10,000 final on the first night of athletics in London, where the reigning double World Champion Cheruiyot of Kenya figured to be her fiercest opponent. Werknesh played a key role in pushing the pace from the front of the pack in the latter half of the race, while Tirunesh stayed behind Cheruiyot and her teammate Sally Kipyego. Tirunesh took the lead with a lap and a quarter to go, and put in a 62-second last lap to become the first woman to successfully retain the Olympic crown in 30:20.75. (Her cousin Derartu did regain it eight years after first winning it.) “I've never been happier,” said Tirunesh. “I've worked very hard for this. Ethiopians gave me a lot of responsibilty.”

 In the 5000 a week later, Tirunesh went to the front with four laps remaining, and it was Meseret who waited to make her move, which she did on the final lap, pulling level with Tirunesh going into the home straight and attacking fiercely to win in 15:04.25 while Cheruiyot passed Tirunesh, the Ethiopian coming  third in 15:05.15. “I'm not very pleased today,” said Tirunesh. “I gave it a good shot, but I wasn't aiming for bronze. I'm a bit disappointed.”

 After the Olympics, Tirunesh defended her Nijmegen 15K title ahead of Ethiopia's new Olympic marathon champion Tiki Gelana before making her much-anticipated half marathon debut. Biding her time behind world marathon champion Edna Kiplagat of Kenya and Tiki at the September Great North Run in England, she made a move with 800m to go, and dropped first her compatriot and then the Kenyan, winning in 1:07:08.

 Tirunesh planned to make her debut over the full marathon in London in April 2013, but injury sustained ahead of the race kept her out of it. “I interrupted training for about two months,” she said in May. “I had an injury to the bottom of my heel. I've been training for about two months since that.” She continued easing successfully into more road racing with a 10K win and national record 30:49 ahead of Latvian Jelena Prokopcuka in Manchester in May.

 Tirunesh won the Eugene DL 5000m in 14:42.01 ahead of four countrywomen seeking fast finishes and Moscow World Championships berths, including London Olympian Belaynesh. But Tirunesh's clocking was eclipsed by three Ethiopians in Oslo on 13 June led by Meseret's new world lead of 14:26.90. So when Tirunesh contested the Paris DL on 6 July, she turned on the burners and clocked the fastest time run since 2008, 14:23.68. Only Ethiopian Almaz Ayana managed to follow Tirunesh and she was rewarded with a huge improvement in her personal best, running 14:25.84. “It was my last race before the World Championships, where I've decided to race the 5000 and 10,000,” said Tirunesh in Paris. “As long as I remain healthy til that time, I'll be running both.”

 Tirunesh booked her 10,000m Moscow ticket in Ostrava, where she improved her own meet record by 27 seconds, running 30:26.67 (ahead of Kenyan Gladys Cherono and Belaynesh), and extending her unbeaten streak over the distance to ten. That clocking was also trumped by Meseret, who ran a world-leading 30:08.06 in a solo run in Sollentuna, Sweden, setting up the prospect of intriguing clashes between the two rivals in Moscow. That expectation was cut short when the Ethiopian federation later decided that each of the women should concentrate solely on contesting their strongest event: Tirunesh the 10,000 and Meseret the 5000. Tirunesh had been ready to tackle the double she achieved in Helsinki in 2005 and Beijing in 2008 and missed accomplishing in London last year, but that dream looks to have been shelved.

 With Meseret no longer running the 10,000 and Cheruiyot out on maternity leave, Tirunesh is expected to readily regain the 10,000 title she last held in 2007, after which she missed two World Championships in a row due to injury. “She really wanted to run both events here,” said Tirunesh's sister Genzebe in Moscow, ahead of Tirunesh's arrival in the Russian capital. “She's eager to be contesting the World Championships again.”

 

Personal Bests

 Indoor

3000m: 8:33.37i (2008)

5000m: 14:27.42i (2007)

 Outdoor

3000m: 8:29.55 (2006)

5000m: 14:11.15 (2008) (WR)

10,000m: 29:54.66 (2008)

  

Yearly Progression

 3000/ 5000/ 10,000: 2002 - 8:41.86/ 14:49.90; 2003 – 8:50.20/ 14:39.94; 2004 – 8:33.56i (WJR)/ 14:53.99i 14:30.88 (WJR); 2005 – /14:32.93i, 14:32.42/ 30:15.67; 2006 – 8:41.22i 8:29.55/ 14:35.46i 14:30.40; 2007 – 8:46.58/ 14:27.42i (WR)/ 31:55.41; 2008 – 8:33.37i/ 14:11.15 (WR)/-/ 29:54.66 (AR); 2009 – -/ 14:33.65/ -; 2010 – 8:40.3i/14:34.07/ 31:51.39A; 2011 – -/-/-; 2012 – -/14:50.80/30:20.75; 2013 – -/14:23.68/30:26.67.

 

Career Highlights

 

2002

2nd

World Cross Country Championships, junior

2002

2nd

World Junior Championships, 5000m

2003

1st

World Cross Country Championships, junior

2003

1st

World Championships, 5000m 

2003

4th

All-Africa Games, 5000m

2003

2nd

Afro-Asian Games, 5000m

2004

2nd

World Cross Country Championships, 4K

2004

3rd

Olympic Games, 5000m

2005

1st

World Cross Country Championships, 4K 

2005

1st

World Cross Country Championships, 8K 

2005

1st

World Championships, 5000m

2005

1st

World Championships, 10,000m

2005

2nd

World Athletics Final, 5000m 

2006

1st

World Cross Country Championships, 8K

2006

2nd

African Championships, 5000m

2006

2nd

World Athletics Final, 3000m

2006

1st

World Athletics Final, 5000m

2006  

1st

World Cup, 3000m

2007  

2nd

World Cross Country Championships, 8K

2007

1st

World Championships, 10,000m

2008

1st

World Cross Country Championships, 8K

2008

1st

African Championships, 10,000m

2008

1st

Olympic Games, 10,000m

2008

1st

Olympic Games, 5000m

2009

2nd

World Athletics Final, 5000m

2010

4th

World Cross Country Championships, 8K

2010

1st

African Athletics Championships, 10,000m

2013

1st

World Championships, 10,000m

2013

3rd

World Championships, 5,000m

 

Note on Ethiopian names: Ethiopians are customarily referred to by first name only or first and second name together, the second name being the father's first name. (The grandfather’s first name is sometimes added as a third name, and is optional in much the same way that a Western middle name is frequently omitted.)

 

 Prepared by Sabrina Yohannes for the IAAF "Focus on Athletes" project. Copyright IAAF 2003-2013.

 

Personal Best - Outdoor
Performance Wind Place Date
3000 Metres 8:29.55 London (CP) 28 JUL 2006
5000 Metres 14:11.15 Oslo (Bislett) 06 JUN 2008
10,000 Metres 29:54.66 Beijing (National Stadium) 15 AUG 2008
10 Kilometres 30:30 Tilburg 01 SEP 2013
15 Kilometres 46:28 Nijmegen 15 NOV 2009
30 Kilometres 1:39:14 London 13 APR 2014
Marathon 2:20:35 London 13 APR 2014
5 Kilometres 15:19 Carlsbad, CA 07 APR 2002
Personal Best - Indoor
Performance Wind Place Date
2000 Metres 5:47.26 Boston (Roxbury), MA 02 FEB 2013
3000 Metres 8:33.37 Boston (Roxbury), MA 26 JAN 2008
Two Miles 9:12.23 Birmingham, GBR 20 FEB 2010
5000 Metres 14:27.42 Boston (Roxbury), MA 27 JAN 2007
Progression - Outdoor showShow All Graphs
3000 Metres Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2009 8:45.61 New York, NY 30 MAY
2006 8:29.55 London (CP) 28 JUL
2003 8:50.20 Lausanne 01 JUL
2002 8:41.86 Bruxelles 30 AUG
5000 Metres Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2013 14:23.68 Paris Saint-Denis 06 JUL
2012 14:50.80 New York City, NY 09 JUN
2010 14:34.07 Eugene, OR 03 JUL
2009 14:33.65 London (CP) 25 JUL
2008 14:11.15 Oslo (Bislett) 06 JUN
2007 14:35.67 New York City, NY 02 JUN
2006 14:30.40 Oslo 02 JUN
2005 14:32.42 New York, NY 11 JUN
2004 14:30.88 Bergen 11 JUN
2003 14:39.94 Oslo 27 JUN
2002 14:49.90 Berlin 06 SEP
10,000 Metres Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2013 30:26.67 Ostrava 27 JUN
2012 30:20.75 London (OP) 03 AUG
2010 31:51.39 Nairobi 31 JUL
2008 29:54.66 Beijing (National Stadium) 15 AUG
2007 31:55.41 Osaka (Nagai Stadium) 25 AUG
2005 30:15.67 Sollentuna 28 JUN
10 Kilometres Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2014 31:09 Manchester 18 MAY
2013 30:30 Tilburg 01 SEP
2012 31:40 Nijmegen 18 NOV
2009 31:24 Nijmegen 15 NOV
15 Kilometres Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2013 48:43 Nijmegen 17 NOV
2012 47:08 Nijmegen 18 NOV
2009 46:28 Nijmegen 15 NOV
30 Kilometres Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2014 1:39:14 London 13 APR
Marathon Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2014 2:20:35 London 13 APR
5 Kilometres Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2002 15:19 Carlsbad, CA 07 APR
Progression - Indoor showShow All Graphs
2000 Metres Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2013 5:47.26 Boston (Roxbury), MA 02 FEB
3000 Metres Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2013 8:38.44 Boston (Roxbury), MA 02 FEB
2010 8:40.3 Birmingham, GBR 20 FEB
2008 8:33.37 Boston (Roxbury), MA 26 JAN
2007 8:46.58 New York (MSG), NY 02 FEB
2006 8:41.22 Birmingham 18 FEB
2004 8:33.56 Birmingham 20 FEB
2003 8:58.75 Boston (Roxbury), MA 01 FEB
Two Miles Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2013 9:13.17 Boston (Roxbury), MA 02 FEB
2012 9:21.60 Boston (Roxbury), MA 04 FEB
2010 9:12.23 Birmingham, GBR 20 FEB
5000 Metres Show Graphshow
Performance Place Date
2010 14:44.53 Boston (Roxbury), MA 06 FEB
2007 14:27.42 Boston (Roxbury), MA 27 JAN
2006 14:35.46 Boston (Roxbury), MA 28 JAN
2005 14:32.93 Boston (Roxbury), MA 29 JAN
2004 14:53.99 Boston (Roxbury), MA 31 JAN
2003 15:40.68 Boston, MA 25 JAN
Honours - 3000 Metres
Rank Mark Wind Place Date
10th IAAF World Cup 1 8:33.78 Athína (Olympic Stadium) 16 SEP 2006
4th IAAF World Athletics Final 2 8:34.74 Stuttgart 10 SEP 2006
Honours - 5000 Metres
Rank Mark Wind Place Date
The XXX Olympic Games 3 15:05.15 London (OP) 10 AUG 2012
IAAF/VTB Bank World Athletics Final 2 15:25.92 Thessaloníki 12 SEP 2009
The XXIX Olympic Games 1 15:41.40 Beijing (National Stadium) 22 AUG 2008
11th IAAF World Championships in Athletics h1 DNS Osaka (Nagai Stadium) 29 AUG 2007
4th IAAF World Athletics Final 1 16:04.77 Stuttgart 09 SEP 2006
3rd IAAF World Athletics Final 2 14:46.84 Monaco 09 SEP 2005
10th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 1 14:38.59 Helsinki 13 AUG 2005
2nd IAAF World Athletics Final f DNS Monaco 18 SEP 2004
28th Olympic Games 3 14:51.83 Athína (Olympic Stadium) 23 AUG 2004
1st IAAF World Athletics Final 3 14:57.87 Monaco 13 SEP 2003
9th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 1 14:51.72 Paris Saint-Denis (Stade de France) 30 AUG 2003
IAAF/Coca Cola World Junior Championships 2 15:55.99 Kingston, JAM 21 JUL 2002
Honours - 10,000 Metres
Rank Mark Wind Place Date
14th IAAF World Championships 1 30:43.35 Moskva (Luzhniki) 11 AUG 2013
The XXX Olympic Games 1 30:20.75 London (OP) 03 AUG 2012
The XXIX Olympic Games 1 29:54.66 Beijing (National Stadium) 15 AUG 2008
11th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 1 31:55.41 Osaka (Nagai Stadium) 25 AUG 2007
10th IAAF World Championships in Athletics 1 30:24.02 Helsinki 06 AUG 2005
Honours - Senior Race
Rank Mark Wind Place Date
38th IAAF World Cross Country Championships 4 24:38 Bydgoszcz 28 MAR 2010
36th IAAF World Cross Country Championships 1 25:10 Edinburgh (Holyrood Park) 30 MAR 2008
35th IAAF World Cross Country Championships 2 26:47 Mombasa 24 MAR 2007
Honours - Junior Race
Rank Mark Wind Place Date
31st IAAF World Cross Country Championships 1 20:21 Lausanne 29 MAR 2003
30th IAAF/Sport Ireland World Cross Country Championships 2 20:14 Dublin 23 MAR 2002
IAAF World Cross Country Championships 5 22:08 Oostende 24 MAR 2001
Honours - Short Race
Rank Mark Wind Place Date
34th IAAF World Cross Country Championships 0 DNF Fukuoka 02 APR 2006
33rd IAAF World Cross Country Championships 1 13:15 Saint-Galmier 20 MAR 2005
32nd IAAF World Cross Country Championships 2 13:09 Bruxelles 21 MAR 2004
31st IAAF World Cross Country Championships 7 12:54 Lausanne 30 MAR 2003
Honours - Long Race
Rank Mark Wind Place Date
34th IAAF World Cross Country Championships 1 25:21 Fukuoka 01 APR 2006
33rd IAAF World Cross Country Championships 1 26:34 Saint-Galmier 19 MAR 2005

Focus on Athletes biographies are produced by the IAAF Communications Dept, and not by the IAAF Statistics and Documentation Division. If you have any enquiries concerning the information, please use the Contact IAAF page, selecting ‘Focus on Athletes Biographies’ in the drop down menu of contact area options.

 

Updated 9 August 2013

TIRUNESH Dibaba, Ethiopia (3000/5000m/10,000m, Cross Country)

Born 1 June, 1985, Chefe, near Bekoji, Arsi region, Ethiopia

Height: 1.55m             Weight: 44kg

Lives in Addis Ababa Club: Corrections (Prison Police) Manager: Mark Wetmore

Coaches: Hussein Shebo (club)

Fourth of six children. Older sister Ejegayehu (b. 1982) is 2004 Olympic silver medalist at 10,000m and 2011 Chicago marathon runner-up; younger brother Dejene (b. 1989) shows promise; younger sister Genzebe (b. 1990) is the 2008 and 2009 World Cross Country Championships junior champion and 2012 World Indoor 1500 Champion. Former Olympic champion Derartu Tulu is their cousin.

 Married Olympic 10,000m silver medalist Sileshi Sihine October 2008.

 The Dibaba sisters grew up near the town of Bekoji hearing about their cousin Derartu winning two Olympic gold medals and a World Championship at 10,000m, but their early athletic efforts were most directly inspired by another cousin, Bekelu Dibaba (whom they refer to as their sister), a moderately successful international runner now living in Belgium. Tirunesh’s older sister Ejegayehu began running competitively in 1998; Tirunesh followed a year later.

 Tirunesh moved to Addis Ababa in 2000 to live with her sister and cousin while finishing high school. She arrived too late for school registration, however, and facing the choice of returning to Bekoji or finding something to do in the city, she turned to running. With the help of Bekelu, a member of the Corrections police sports club, Tirunesh joined the club and began training fulltime. Within a year she qualified for Ethiopia’s 2001 junior World Cross team and, not yet 16, finished a close 5th in Ostend.

 In her first full year of international running, 2002, Tirunesh fell just short of the top spot in several major competitions. She was runner-up to Kenya's Viola Kibiwot in the Junior Women's race at the World Cross in Dublin, to Deena Drossin's World road best in the Carlsbad (California) 5 km, to her teammate Meseret Defar in the 5000m at the World Junior Championships in Jamaica, and to Werknesh Kidane in the Great Ethiopian Run 10K. The following year, she broke out in the most emphatic way, winning the 5000m at the Paris World Championships and becoming the youngest individual winner in the history of the championships. Yet for all her youth, Tirunesh’s performances earlier in 2003 had showed her potential.

 She streaked past favored Werknesh to take the 4km title at Ethiopia’s World Cross trials, and strode to a clear win in the junior World Cross in Lausanne. In June, she followed a 5000m World record attempt in Oslo til the final 200m, setting a World junior record (14:39.94) in third place in the process. And in July she won the Ethiopian title at 5000 over a formidable field.

 2004 was a year of mixed results. In early January, she defeated cousin Derartu for the first time in Newcastle's Great North Cross Country. She set two indoor World junior records, 14:53.99 for 5000 in Boston and 8:33.56 for 3000m in Birmingham. She took 2nd in the 4 km race at the World Cross in Brussels and notched her second outdoor World junior mark (14:30.88) in the Bislett GL 5000, assuring her selection for the Olympics.

 In the Athens 5000m final, she followed Ethiopian-born Turk Elvan Abeylegesse but couldn’t stay with Kenya’s Isabella Ochichi’s lead in the oppressive heat. As Meseret sprinted past the Kenyan with 200m to go, Tirunesh took bronze, becoming the youngest ever Ethiopian Olympic medallist.

 Early in 2005 she smashed the World 5000m indoor record in Boston, her 14:32.93 taking nearly seven seconds off Berhane Adere’s mark. Back in Addis Ababa for the Ethiopian World Cross trials, she sprinted past Meselech Melkamu in a thrilling finish to take the 8 km title and was named to both the short and long course World Cross teams in view of her form, which she declared the best ever. In France, she became the second woman after Ireland’s Sonia O’Sullivan in 1998 and the third athlete after her compatriot Kenenisa Bekele to take double gold, signalling that 2005 was to be her year.

 A week later, Tirunesh matched Briton Paula Radcliffe’s recognised 5K road World best of 14:51 at the Carlsbad 5000. At the Helsinki World Championships, Tirunesh eclipsed her own World Cross double by becoming the first woman to achieve distance double gold on the track. She beat defending champion Berhane in a 58.53 last lap sprint and led her and her own sister Ejegayehu in a 10,000m sweep, before spearheading a historic sweep of the top four places in the 5000m, outsprinting Meseret in a 58.19 last 400m, with Ejegayehu taking bronze and Meselech Melkamu fourth. Tirunesh collected the IAAF award for the female Performance of the Year for her Championships efforts.

 

An attempt at a second golden World Cross double in Fukuoka was her season’s focus but illness cost Tirunesh three days’ training in the week before the 2006 Championships, and she suffered from stitches during the long course race in which the Netherlands’ Lornah Kiplagat took the lead almost from the gun until the bell lap. But Tirunesh remained in contact and kicked ferociously on the final hill, successfully defending her title.

 Tirunesh’s outdoor season was dominated by her bid for six Golden League wins and a share of the $1 million jackpot. She took a decisive victory in Oslo, winning the 5000m in a personal best 14:30.40  but the competition heated up when Meseret, fresh off a 14:24.53 World record run in New York on 3 June, joined the hunt for 5 GL wins and a share of half of the jackpot. Sparks flew in the close finishes of each race, and Tirunesh prevailed in Paris, Rome and Brussels and won in Zurich in Meseret’s absence, remaining undefeated in 5 GL outings and guaranteeing a share of the jackpot. But at the African Championships in Mauritius, Tirunesh, recovering from illness, lost badly to Meseret over 5000m. And then, at the final GL meet in Berlin on 3 September, where Tirunesh was one of four athletes poised to take a share of the larger jackpot by pulling off a 6th win,  Meseret’s last lap chase and win deprived Tirunesh of an additional $125,000 a win could have netted her. 

 The pair battled again down the homestretch at the World Athletics Final, Tirunesh getting her revenge over 5000m in a photo finish and Meseret prevailing in the 3000. Both women topped the podium at the Athens World Cup, with Defar taking the 5000m crown while the “baby-faced destroyer,” as Tirunesh has come to be described, won the 3000m.

 In 2007, Tirunesh smashed her own World indoor 5000m record in Boston on 27 January, slicing 5 and a half seconds off to clock 14:27.42, and she focused on the defense of her 8K title at the World Cross Country Championships in Mombasa, where she was heavily favoured. But she (along with almost the entire Ethiopian team) was defeated by the coastal city’s heat and humidity and she took silver behind the Netherlands’ Lornah Kiplagat, while holding off the in-form Meselech.

 Tirunesh raced sparingly that summer and in her defense of her Helsinki crowns in Osaka, she was hampered by a mid-race tumble and abdominal pains in the 10,000 that left her periodically clutching her stomach. She overcame both to win the longer race (in 31:55.41), but only through a heroic effort, and she withdrew from the 5000 (which Meseret won). The abdominal pain continued to dog her afterwards.

 Tirunesh then focused on regaining the title she lost in Mombasa at the Edinburgh World Cross Country Championships in 2008. Just as the tone of the day in Mombasa had been set by the disastrous outing of the junior women, including Genzebe, the theme in Edinburgh was indicated by Ethiopia’s gold in that race, won by Genzebe herself in a sprint. Inspired by her sister, Tirunesh clawed her way back to the lead group of the senior race after falling behind midway due to a recurrence of abdominal pain. In the last 400m, she reined in Kenya’s Linet Masai, Edinburgh cross country meet winner Gelete Burka and eventual silver medallist Mestawet Tufa to join her cousin Derartu, American Lynn Jennings and Norwegian Grete Waitz in the ranks of women who have won cross country gold at least three times. Ethiopia went on to sweep all four individual titles in Edinburgh.

 The once reticent Tirunesh, who is still shy but less so than when greatness was first thrust upon her, now embraces the expectations placed upon her, and she lived up to Ethiopia’s anticipation of a medal sweep in the 2008 African Championships 10,000m in Addis Ababa in May, where she led her sister and Wude Ayalew across the line.

 Greater things were to come in the season, however, and she slashed Meseret’s 14:16.63 2007 World 5000m record to 14:11.15 in Oslo on June 6. Tirunesh ran 31:03.37 for 10,000 in Ostrava and was entered in both events at the Olympics, where she sought to repeat the double she completed at the Worlds in 2005.

 In Beijing, Tirunesh not only demolished her opponents over 10,000m, including a relentless Abeylegesse, but she ran a stunning 29:54.66, a clocking that had been surpassed only by the 1993 29:31.78 World record of China’s Wang Junxia. Though its pedestrian pace yielded a tame finish, the 5000m final days later also saw Tirunesh and Abeylegesse climb to the top of the podium, with 2004 defending champion Meseret relegated to bronze. Tirunesh had again done something no other woman before her had accomplished: take distance double gold at the Olympics.

 Tirunesh and two-time Olympic 10,000m silver medalist Sileshi Sihine were married in a lavish ceremony in Addis Ababa on 26 October, when throngs lined the streets to wish the happy couple well between their wedding day festivities at various venues. Having taken a lengthy break, Tirunesh resumed training a couple of months later, only to suffer an injury, later determined to be shin splints.

 She skipped the entire cross country and indoor season and avoided hard track training and returned to competition in New York on 30 May 2009. “I haven’t trained as much on the track as before because of my leg injury,” said Tirunesh, before suffering a rare defeat over 5000m and taking second to Kenyan Linet Masai in 14:40.93. Tirunesh withdrew from a much-anticipated clash with Meseret over the distance in Oslo and competed just one other time during the season, displaying her form with a world-leading 14:33.65 in London on 25 July.

 Tirunesh was entered in both the 10,000 and 5000m at the 2009 World Championships, but in the days before the start of competition, she interrupted a training session due to injury to her left big toe and sought medical attention, following which she eventually pulled out of both championship races.

 She returned to competition at the September World Athletics Final 5000m, where she placed second over 5000 behind Meseret, but it was on 15 November when she joined her husband at the Nijmegen 15K road race that she proved her fitness.  “We prepared for the competition together … I felt very good during the race,” said Tirunesh, who ran a World record 46.28 in her debut over the distance.

 Tirunesh was defeated only once in eight outings in 2010. She began by dominating in the snow of the Great Edinburgh cross country 6K on 9 January, where she kicked in the final lap and won by an 8-second margin over Kenya’s 2009 World 5000m champion, Vivian Cheruiyot, and emerging Ethiopian star, Kalkidan Gezahegn (who later took World Indoor 1500m gold). Though an assault be Tirunesh's on the World two-mile best in Birmingham was unsuccessful, it gave her a swift 9:12.23 finish, more than 10 seconds ahead of runner-up Cheruiyot.

 Nevertheless, Tirunesh said that she felt her 15K road training in late 2009 interfered with her work over shorter distances and left her hesitant to compete at the 2010 World Cross Country Championships that she had initially intended to contest. When asked in March by the Ethiopian federation to represent the nation in Bydgoszcz, however, she headed up the team on less-than-usual preparation, and was dropped by Emily Chebet and Linet Masai of Kenya and Meselech Melkamu, who medaled ahead of her fourth place finish. Tirunesh did rack up a 20th World Cross medal with the team silver she helped garner, though.

 Tirunesh saw the abdominal pains that plagued her in the past resurface intermittently, but she won both of her 5000m races at Diamond League meets in New York and Eugene, running a 57-second final lap in the former.

 In the African Athletics Championships 10,000m in Nairobi, Tirunesh faced the reigning World 10,000 and Cross Country medalist Meselech and the World 10,000 Champion Masai racing on home turf. Tirunesh headed to Kenya undefeated in six career races over 10,000m from her debut in 2005 till her Beijing victory.

 In her defense of her 2008 African title, Tirunesh followed Masai’s lead until the final lap, when she sprinted past the Kenyan, taking Ethiopia’s only gold of the 2010 championships in 31:51.39 well clear of Meselech and Masai. Tirunesh confirmed she was indeed back to winning form when she again beat a strong field at the London Aviva Diamond League 5000 on 13 August. A 59-second last lap took her to a 14:36.41 victory over African 5000 champion Cheruiyot (14:38.17), the then-Diamond League leader Sentayehu Ejigu, and Masai.

 Tirunesh experienced a recurrence of the shin injury that eventually cost her all of 2011 after she withdrew from the Prefontaine Classic 5000 and missed the 2011 Daegu world championships. “I experienced a lot of pain,” she said.

 Her first race back was a road 10K on New Year’s Eve in Madrid, where she returned to winning ways, prevailing in a sprint duel over Gelete, with both women clocking 31.30. “Today was my first competition for so long, I have to be satisfied,” she told the IAAF website. “I’m now fully recovered from injury, my trainings are going well.” Indoors in Boston, in February 2012, she ran 9:21.60 for two miles with some two months and three track sessions under her belt since resuming training.

 

She limited her outdoor build-up to the London Olympics to just one track race over 5000 and 10,000 each after kicking off the season in April with a victory at the Carlsbad 5000 on the road in 15:01 over Werknesh Kidane. “I hadn’t raced in a while then and there was a bit of a wind, so I didn’t run as fast a time as I wanted,” said Tirunesh.

 Her 1 June Prefontaine Classic race in Eugene put her at the top of the list of London-bound Ethiopian women in the 10,000 when she grabbed her side during the race due to a return of the old abdominal pains, but still hung on to kick past her fellow Ethiopian and London berth seeker Belaynesh Oljira and Kenyan Florence Kiplagat, winning in 30:24.39. “It was my first track race outdoors and I had prepared well for it,” said Tirunesh. “I had pain during the race and if it hadn’t been for that, I expected to run a fast time.” Werknesh completed the Ethiopian trio that earned Olympic slots there.

 The 9 June New York DL gave spectators an unexpected treat when Meseret was added to the 5000m field, but Tirunesh easily took the measure of her rival, running a decisive last lap to win. “Because I raced last week, I didn’t want to follow the pacers,” she said. “I aimed to win and I planned to kick at the end, and that’s what I did.” The 14:50.80 finish, however, was only the year’s fourth-fastest among her compatriots. Season bests being Ethiopia’s primary selection criterion for the Olympics, Tirunesh was named a reserve on that event, behind Meseret, Gelete and the less experienced Genet Yalew.

 The athletics federation also looks at runners’ current fitness both in naming the entries of three athletes and a reserve, and in determining which of the four athletes will eventually run, and Tirunesh eventually doubled in London in a bid to defend her Beijing titles.

 But first she led Belaynesh and Werknesh in the 10,000 final on the first night of athletics in London, where the reigning double World Champion Cheruiyot of Kenya figured to be her fiercest opponent. Werknesh played a key role in pushing the pace from the front of the pack in the latter half of the race, while Tirunesh stayed behind Cheruiyot and her teammate Sally Kipyego. Tirunesh took the lead with a lap and a quarter to go, and put in a 62-second last lap to become the first woman to successfully retain the Olympic crown in 30:20.75. (Her cousin Derartu did regain it eight years after first winning it.) “I've never been happier,” said Tirunesh. “I've worked very hard for this. Ethiopians gave me a lot of responsibilty.”

 In the 5000 a week later, Tirunesh went to the front with four laps remaining, and it was Meseret who waited to make her move, which she did on the final lap, pulling level with Tirunesh going into the home straight and attacking fiercely to win in 15:04.25 while Cheruiyot passed Tirunesh, the Ethiopian coming  third in 15:05.15. “I'm not very pleased today,” said Tirunesh. “I gave it a good shot, but I wasn't aiming for bronze. I'm a bit disappointed.”

 After the Olympics, Tirunesh defended her Nijmegen 15K title ahead of Ethiopia's new Olympic marathon champion Tiki Gelana before making her much-anticipated half marathon debut. Biding her time behind world marathon champion Edna Kiplagat of Kenya and Tiki at the September Great North Run in England, she made a move with 800m to go, and dropped first her compatriot and then the Kenyan, winning in 1:07:08.

 Tirunesh planned to make her debut over the full marathon in London in April 2013, but injury sustained ahead of the race kept her out of it. “I interrupted training for about two months,” she said in May. “I had an injury to the bottom of my heel. I've been training for about two months since that.” She continued easing successfully into more road racing with a 10K win and national record 30:49 ahead of Latvian Jelena Prokopcuka in Manchester in May.

 Tirunesh won the Eugene DL 5000m in 14:42.01 ahead of four countrywomen seeking fast finishes and Moscow World Championships berths, including London Olympian Belaynesh. But Tirunesh's clocking was eclipsed by three Ethiopians in Oslo on 13 June led by Meseret's new world lead of 14:26.90. So when Tirunesh contested the Paris DL on 6 July, she turned on the burners and clocked the fastest time run since 2008, 14:23.68. Only Ethiopian Almaz Ayana managed to follow Tirunesh and she was rewarded with a huge improvement in her personal best, running 14:25.84. “It was my last race before the World Championships, where I've decided to race the 5000 and 10,000,” said Tirunesh in Paris. “As long as I remain healthy til that time, I'll be running both.”

 Tirunesh booked her 10,000m Moscow ticket in Ostrava, where she improved her own meet record by 27 seconds, running 30:26.67 (ahead of Kenyan Gladys Cherono and Belaynesh), and extending her unbeaten streak over the distance to ten. That clocking was also trumped by Meseret, who ran a world-leading 30:08.06 in a solo run in Sollentuna, Sweden, setting up the prospect of intriguing clashes between the two rivals in Moscow. That expectation was cut short when the Ethiopian federation later decided that each of the women should concentrate solely on contesting their strongest event: Tirunesh the 10,000 and Meseret the 5000. Tirunesh had been ready to tackle the double she achieved in Helsinki in 2005 and Beijing in 2008 and missed accomplishing in London last year, but that dream looks to have been shelved.

 With Meseret no longer running the 10,000 and Cheruiyot out on maternity leave, Tirunesh is expected to readily regain the 10,000 title she last held in 2007, after which she missed two World Championships in a row due to injury. “She really wanted to run both events here,” said Tirunesh's sister Genzebe in Moscow, ahead of Tirunesh's arrival in the Russian capital. “She's eager to be contesting the World Championships again.”

 

Personal Bests

 Indoor

3000m: 8:33.37i (2008)

5000m: 14:27.42i (2007)

 Outdoor

3000m: 8:29.55 (2006)

5000m: 14:11.15 (2008) (WR)

10,000m: 29:54.66 (2008)

  

Yearly Progression

 3000/ 5000/ 10,000: 2002 - 8:41.86/ 14:49.90; 2003 – 8:50.20/ 14:39.94; 2004 – 8:33.56i (WJR)/ 14:53.99i 14:30.88 (WJR); 2005 – /14:32.93i, 14:32.42/ 30:15.67; 2006 – 8:41.22i 8:29.55/ 14:35.46i 14:30.40; 2007 – 8:46.58/ 14:27.42i (WR)/ 31:55.41; 2008 – 8:33.37i/ 14:11.15 (WR)/-/ 29:54.66 (AR); 2009 – -/ 14:33.65/ -; 2010 – 8:40.3i/14:34.07/ 31:51.39A; 2011 – -/-/-; 2012 – -/14:50.80/30:20.75; 2013 – -/14:23.68/30:26.67.

 

Career Highlights

 

2002

2nd

World Cross Country Championships, junior

2002

2nd

World Junior Championships, 5000m

2003

1st

World Cross Country Championships, junior

2003

1st

World Championships, 5000m 

2003

4th

All-Africa Games, 5000m

2003

2nd

Afro-Asian Games, 5000m

2004

2nd

World Cross Country Championships, 4K

2004

3rd

Olympic Games, 5000m

2005

1st

World Cross Country Championships, 4K 

2005

1st

World Cross Country Championships, 8K 

2005

1st

World Championships, 5000m

2005

1st

World Championships, 10,000m

2005

2nd

World Athletics Final, 5000m 

2006

1st

World Cross Country Championships, 8K

2006

2nd

African Championships, 5000m

2006

2nd

World Athletics Final, 3000m

2006

1st

World Athletics Final, 5000m

2006  

1st

World Cup, 3000m

2007  

2nd

World Cross Country Championships, 8K

2007

1st

World Championships, 10,000m

2008

1st

World Cross Country Championships, 8K

2008

1st

African Championships, 10,000m

2008

1st

Olympic Games, 10,000m

2008

1st

Olympic Games, 5000m

2009

2nd

World Athletics Final, 5000m

2010

4th

World Cross Country Championships, 8K

2010

1st

African Athletics Championships, 10,000m

2013

1st

World Championships, 10,000m

2013

3rd

World Championships, 5,000m

 

Note on Ethiopian names: Ethiopians are customarily referred to by first name only or first and second name together, the second name being the father's first name. (The grandfather’s first name is sometimes added as a third name, and is optional in much the same way that a Western middle name is frequently omitted.)

 

 Prepared by Sabrina Yohannes for the IAAF "Focus on Athletes" project. Copyright IAAF 2003-2013.